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Showing content with the highest reputation on 09/20/22 in all areas

  1. You can see why this was SO HARD to hold onto, because it's so freaking brilliant, the way it's done. It's almost as though the retcon inserts a massive time break *within* MI2... between the tunnels and when the kids emerge. Into that gap goes everything... Curse, Escape, Tales and who knows what else. What's more, it sets up this storytelling framework that takes the emphasis off the details. Does it really matter if all of the details fit perfectly? Maybe not so much. It reminds me of the alternate timeline thing in the Star Trek reboots (before that became a big trend) — a clever way of sidestepping all of the canon and continuity questions. And it takes the question "How can you do a Monkey Island game that picks up right at the end of MI2 but still incorporates everything thereafter" and ties it up in a neat little bow. I mean, seriously... just effing brilliant.
    4 points
  2. The other thing this neatly resolves that I've been thinking of a lot lately but that I never really bothered to say out loud because it was such a minor point to me, is that I was never quite satisfied with the 'this is all just young guybrush's imagination' in ONE way, which is that while it made sense of a lot of what was going on in the first games, sometimes Guybrush's thoughts were a bit too grown up for it to quite fit. And I don't even mean in big, obvious ways, but in tiny little ways too - like, how likely is it that a small boy would know enough about food to know they hate vichyssoise? But if you reframe it all as 'these are things that either an older guybrush is making up as stories for his kid, or embellishing a little in the retelling (I wonder if by the end we'll get to know which - I sort of hope this is a let-the-audience-decide scenario, but I don't mind either way), and then his own kid is imagining re-enacting them and adding his own embellishments and flourishes, it makes PERFECT sense of it all. Everything is explainable as either being seen through the lens of storyteller-Guybrush or Boybrush. If you don't like the idea that some of the events in EMI happened 'for real', hey - you can just say 'well, to me, that game is just bits of stories told by Guybrush that Boybrush has further distorted into his own weird riff about a robot with his dad's encouragement.' Viewed through that lens, I even like it a little more than I did previously. If you don't like how weird and fast Elaine and Guybrush's romance was in MI1 you can explain that as Guybrush glossing over a lot of the icky details in front of his son and exaggerating their flirting for comic effect in a way that would make Boybrush laugh, OR you can imagine it as Boybrush's own imagined re-enactment of how that moment would have gone. This is a tremendous gift, I think, as it basically just gives us the MI universe and lets us all make of it what we will.
    3 points
  3. Absolutely adoring the game so far. One minor thing that's annoying me a bit, unrelated to the actual game itself tho, and it would be super easy for them to patch this. As far as I can tell there's no way to get guybrush to walk continuously in the direction of the pointer in panning shots without spam-clicking. I liked how in thimbleweed park you could just hold down the mouse cursor in panning shots to move all the way across them, but now it seems the guybrush doesn't start moving until you let go of the mouse button, which makes the game feel slightly less responsive than I'd like. Maybe controller is the way to go?
    3 points
  4. ...and may I add that this TOTALLY DID NOT GET ME RIGHT IN THE FEELS BECAUSE IT HIT SO EERILY CLOSE TO HOME.
    3 points
  5. ENDING SPOILERS Just finished my first (arguably intense, but not deliberately rushed) playthrough. Absolutely loved it overall, but I'm unsure of how to feel about that ending. Might need to process it a bit more. At the same time though, I get it. The Secret is whatever we, as the fans, think it is. It's the memories and joy it brought us and it's meant to be left open to our imaginations. My read is that the entire series was real, and the Guybrush we see in the framing device was an older version embellishing for his son. If you think about it alongside the concepts introduced in Escape, it makes more sense, as the old ways were already crumbling. It makes sense for his kids to be growing up in a world where Pirates have become a folk tale, a novelty. Now they've settled down he can play "pirates" in a themed theme park with Elaine and his son, and whilst his tales are accurate for the most part he likes to mess with the endings in the cringeworthy way that only a Dad can. In the end, it's down to our interpretation and that's how I'm seeing it. I'd be interested to hear others' thoughts though.
    3 points
  6. I also have to say after finishing this we might FINALLY have a new contender for the coveted crown of Monkey Island game with least monkeys.
    2 points
  7. I'm still going through part I, but I must say I wouldn't mind having a whole game centered around little Guybrush as a main character
    2 points
  8. To my mind the whole point is that there is no official 'really happened'. You can decide that it all basically happened just as Guybrush said but with a few imaginitive wrinkles thrown in by his son, or you can decide it sort of happened buy Guybrush exaggerated and changed a lot of it, or that it sort of happened but Boybrush imagines a lot of the details and changes a lot of stuff, or that none of it happened at all and it's just fun stories Guybrush is making up for his kid which he's then taking and running with. It's true freedom that, that I think any attempt at peeling back the curtain any further would probably hurt.
    2 points
  9. I've only played the prologue and explored Melee so far - all the characters keep telling me to go to the docks, but I've been resisting it so far and just wandering around. I've been enjoying the dialogue a lot, and haven't felt the need to turn on subtitles like I thought I would. My favorite part so far is pestering Locke Smith by asking what every lock and key do. Her answers feel very Grossman in their specificity, and are just the kind of detail I love about these games.
    2 points
  10. I don't want to hover like it's a huge deal; I can think of it as Guybrush being forgetful/vacant. I rank it up there with MI2 asserting that the Voodoo Lady helped make the voodoo antiroot in MI1. (Which I blame on Voodoo Lady's mindgame machinations, of course...) But aside from that.. 1. LeChuck wanted Elaine made into an undead-demon bride, as stated and attempted via Voodoo Cannonball at Part 1, and then via cursed lava rollercoaster at the endgame. (Regardless of having a hold filled with random voodoo crud, of which many could have damaged or cursed Elaine if used on her.) 2. Even if LeChuck had planned to make Elaine a statue, it was Guybrush who did it. LeChuck exploded and was MIA, presumed defeated, when Guybrush did what he did. Accept your own responsibility, Mr. Brush!
    2 points
  11. What I also found interesting is Guybrush says something very similar on the back-cover of Curse. If that was intentional, that's incredible attention to detail the designers have.
    2 points
  12. This I agree with. It is a bit weird that Guybrush doesn't really acknowledge his part in causing the problem in the first place but that IS sort of in character for him. I think perhaps some might have been hoping he'd accept more responsibility based on other chats I've had. But... and this is just me ... but I've always thought this idea that Curse is sort of a redemptive arc for Guybrush in which he literally and metaphorically earns Elaine's love to be a bit of a reach. Curse to me is a very standard story of Guybrush causing trouble by acting before he thinks and other people ending up worse off for it and then him clumsily fixing it. It's fine that some people have weaved in an interpretation of Curse that tells it as a growth story for Guybrush where he learns the error of his ways from MI2, but I think you need a microscope to read that subtext, if it exists at all.
    2 points
  13. Not far enough into Return to rank it, but... 1. MI2 2. Secret 3. Curse 4. Tales 5. Escape For a while, MI2 and Curse were tied for #1 to me, but having replayed the series ahead of Return, I've had to change my mind. The parts of Curse that I like, I really do love, but... the rushed and sudden ending, the carnival area, the way the entire town of Puerto Pollo is one screen seen from a distance + interiors... still a great game, but it's not as perfect as my memory of it was. Meanwhile, I gained a lot of new appreciation for Secret in my recent playthrough - especially the part set on Monkey Island, with its air of mystery and with its nature scenes.
    2 points
  14. First of all: What a great game so far! I was even more amazed by the whole look and feel than I expected: the animations are fantastic, the voiceover is great, the dialogues are charming and funny (without being too silly or forced). I love all the little details - and I especially love the music (it's so good!). As for the beginning, I have to admit that I was a bit disappointed at first, because I expected a bit more of a "resolution". But maybe, as a non-father, I'm also missing the emotional connection a bit…? But thinking on it a bit more, I think it's very well solved and certainly the best possible solution to the strange ending of MI2 (if you have to pick it up.). I'm also pretty sure that anything else would have disappointed me much more. It's very well done, is fun - and how can you not like Little Guybrush? And as others have pointed out, it solves many other problems regarding details, incontinuity, the other sequels etc. … so I'm totally fine with it in the end!
    2 points
  15. I don't know if anyone else got this ending, but I just went back the way I came through the monkey head and the game just ended with an achievement notification saying "I don't believe". Clearly I've missed a very different ending if I just turn the switches off
    2 points
  16. Man, I cried my eyes out, it was beautiful. I was always afraid that if Ron should ever do his original idea for Monkey3, everything from Curse, Escape and Tales would've been thrown away, but this.... oh man... This beginning just ties it all together in a really sweet way, even solving some of the story inconsistenties the series had.
    2 points
  17. Demone, I think you're very much in the right place on this, and I'm probably going to end up restating a lot of what you said. Whilst in Seattle a couple of weekends back, I told Ron and Dave that I kind of see them as Lynchian figures. By which I mean that I'm not 100% certain whether they know precisely what they're doing and it's up to us to decode it, or whether things aren't set in stone even in their own minds and the ambiguity is, in itself, part of the goal. But most importantly — same as I feel with Lynch — I'm not sure it matters. There's a very simple, surface way to interpret the ending. There are various meta levels you could easily apply to it. There are a lot of angles from which you can approach an interpretation. But I guess I'm just not convinced that ANY of them carry any weight beyond that which we feel compelled to add. The story isn't about the secret. It never really was. The possibility of learning some deep secret was *never* the real appeal of Monkey Island for any of us. And my feeling is that they've given us a nice soft landing to become comfortable with its ambiguity. Whether Guybrush is a pirate or a flooring inspector (or both), whether the stories are true or embellished tales or total fabrications for his kid's benefit... who cares? I'm reminded of how the Coen brothers kicked off Fargo with the completely fabricated "fact" that it was based on a true story. But a story doesn't have to be lowercase true to be uppercase True. Whether or not you're comfortable with the ending depends, I think, on whether that distinction is important to you.
    2 points
  18. I don’t know how much there is. I heard it described as playing a DVD with the deleted scene special features stitched back in. In my experience that is good for satisfying intellectual curiosity and sometimes it works really well, but often you say “ah yeah I see why that was cut, in context.” Seemed like a good “second playthrough” feature to me.
    1 point
  19. The funniest detail about the three pirates from the MI1 cover was the fact that one of them actually still wore the belt with "PURCELL" on it. Also, as soon as I entered the prison and saw everone wearing striped prison uniforms, I said to myself, "The only logical thing to do is to have Stan have stationary stripes, like his plaid jacket", and bingo, there it was. Music-wise they've referenced a lot of classic tracks, like the diving theme from MI2, each time Guybrush was underwater and obviously the love theme when Guybrush and Elaine shared the screen. Also, I'm sure I heard at least one track from ToMI referenced somewhere.
    1 point
  20. Not even putting spoiler tags around this one.
    1 point
  21. Blown away by this game so far, for reasons everyone else is saying. They went all in on character with those closeups and the first-person mouseover text and I am LOVING it. The mouseover text is so elegant, a wonderful touch. The scrapbook discrepancies felt to me as specifically retcons to present Guybrush and Elaine's relationship as smoother and sweeter all along (even in light of all the new mushy lenses to view the series through). Don't know where the game will go, but their first interaction was hecka wholesome. I played Curse for the first time recently (no nostalgia) and that game putting them in love after MI2 is wild, the biggest retcon. For Return to embrace the marriage as it's doing, it may as well in turn make a few small tweaks to support that. That's how it came off to me at least. What a needle thread, and yes! This feels like a Humongous game for a wider audience. The Prologue's tone is great and so in line with those games! This feels like it's taking a lot from Humongous so far. Those games dropped the verbs necessarily all the way back then, and were breezy clean adventures for it (with very simple puzzles). Making them for kids but enjoyable by parents meant simple and readable, going down smooth, with high quality and good taste. This is finally taking up that torch and going further with it. There's heritage down to specific presentation too. Clicking on a character and hearing a small tree-less interaction, then clicking again for a different also snappy interaction is straight from those games. Marrying LucasArts adventures with some Humongous flow and readability is working really really well so far.
    1 point
  22. As an additional layer of complexity there's a third narrator, the one who narrates the 'Meanwhile...' scenes in LeChuck's ship and his fortress, which Guybrush cannot possibly have knowledge of. The more I think about the Boybrush Solution, the more I love it. On one level it ties everything up - and on another it adds yet more ambiguity to everything we've seen so far. And to take us all by surprise even though we've had 30 years to think about it - that's just genius.
    1 point
  23. Well, I feel weirdly pleased with myself about talking so much about how all the pre-release speculation is part of the fun of all this, and that we should value that more, in the context of the ending I just watched. Also: here is a list of idle thoughts I've had while and after playing the game that are in no particular order: I can not imagine them coming up with a better solution to the end of MI2 than the prologue. It ticks all the boxes I wanted it to: it surprised me (a little bit, I did call some of it), it leaves a lot open to interpretation, and it allows for an explanation of some of the mystery surrounding the series without removing the kind of eerie ambiguity that it needs. It somehow performs the magic trick of making it so that everyone who has had an idea about what was going on the end of MI2 gets to be a LITTLE bit right. Except people who thought it was all just a voodoo spell and nothing more? I guess those people would have a hard time claiming they're right. No but hang on, since we're never shown what REALLY happened in Guybrush's version of events, even THOSE people could claim that LeChuck still placed Guybrush under a spell at that part of the story, and everyone STILL gets to walk away happy. Remarkable. I think the way they treat Elaine in this game is as good as possible, given that they didn't want to address the trouble the relationship has been in, in the past. It makes sense to me that she is here own person, with her own agenda, not directly supporting his agenda (and having her own) but not going out of her way to interfere with it, either. I think that's a fairly healthy way to run a relationship between two people whose ambitions might occasionally otherwise cause tensions. Structurally the game feels quite different to the ones before it. For the first 3 parts we explore some specific locations, then only when it gets to part IV does it feel like the game really opens out with island hopping fun and a high number of nested puzzle threads happening at once. I don't think it's a negative, it's just not quite how I imagined it working. Melee really does feel like the most important island in the game. It has the most characters and locations over all, and it features in more of the parts of the games, and so forth. I'm fine with it. Terror Island just was a terrifying island. I guess sometimes it does live up to the name. Huh. That said, I don't know if I really got a sense of place with the other islands in the same way as Melee. They don't feel quite so lived in, quite so fleshed out as, say, Booty, Scabb, or Phatt, or even Plunder and Blood Island. I can't help but feel like they come off more like... places that exist in order for Guybrush to have puzzles in them, rather than places with their own life independent of whatever Guybrush is up to. Brrr Muda comes closest to feeling like it is a real place, but it's still a bit empty. Most people just grunt. There's a town hall, a courthouse and a prison camp and a castle, and the town hall is basically rooms set up for 3 trials. I'm not quite lost in the vibe of it in the same way as something like Scabb.
    1 point
  24. Weird, last part was not entirely dissimilar for me, either.
    1 point
  25. Guybrush had no way of knowing the ring would turn her into a statue, right? If I remember correctly, he doesn't know it's cursed until Wally shows up and tells him and Elaine right after he proposes to her. I guess his mistake was proposing to Elaine with a ring that he stole, but LeChuck is presumably the one who put the curse on the ring. It's on-brand for Guybrush to not accept responsibility for it, of course. It is kind of funny how the scrapbook glosses over it like "here's another crazy thing that happened one time - Elaine was a statue for a while, and was got briefly swallowed by a snake! Anyway... "). Boy, I'm glad to have stumbled into the Curse of Monkey Island spoiler thread where we can discuss the plot intricacies of this groundbreaking follow-up to Ron Gilbert's Monkey Island 2.
    1 point
  26. In Tales, Elaine squarely places the blame on Guybrush for turning her into a statue (It's during a scene in TOMI part 4, when she's been summoned to testify in court). Elaine was affected by the pox of LeChuck at the time, and giving a very negative spiel about the guy (brush) as a result, but still. I guess kind of feel the same way as @BaronGrackle here, if I'm reading their viewpoint right. The line about LeChuck seeing Elaine as furniture, as objectifying her, has potential to be powerful commentary. But compared with the reality it seems off. And it can be explained by an unreliable narrator! It's not a satisfying explaination imo, but it is one. Its unsatisfying because if you look at the events of Curse, and the scrapbook lines from Guybrush in RTMI, it really sounds like Guybrush is the one ACTUALLY treating Elaine like furniture. And that's icky, isn't it. Don't like it. come on guy, yanno Although I'll play along and go with the RTMI telling of CMI being canon for the story of RTMI, why not. The TOMI Elaine spiel I'm talking about also contains a bit of a retcon I don't like (That the ending if MI2 was Guybrush intentionally abandoning her) (I guess poxed Elaine's also a bit of an unreliable narrator here).
    1 point
  27. This is close to my arc with it. I got to the end and literally sat back from my computer in my chair and said "huh." And then was quiet for a little while. Then paced around my house for ten minutes thinking . Then went and excitedly told my wife all my thoughts on it because I had no one else to tell because nobody knew the game existed yet (she said "cool" or something, and I can't blame her because it WAS COOL).
    1 point
  28. My stages of dealing with the ending: Slight disappointment. Think about it for ten minutes; things sink in; not actually that disappointed. Think about that I've been thinking about it for ten minutes -- must mean they've done something right. Appreciation sinks in. It was the "right" thing to do. Set up the second play-through. Plan on re-watching Twin Peaks: The Return. (And possibly The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari.)
    1 point
  29. The prologue did the impossible in threading the needle and turning the cliffhanger from Revenge into a new-user friendly tutorial section. I've just played Putt-Putt Saves the Zoo with my little kids, and that whole section had a Humongous vibe to it - albeit with plenty of gross touches that suggest a disturbing rot underneath the happy-go-lucky veneer. To suggest a layer of meta-commentary for whoever write the dissertation about the prologue: It's interesting to think about this section in light of the fact that the first thing Ron did after he wrote the end of LeChuck's Revenge was create a mini-universe of children's games with wide-eyed, optimistic protagonists who are cut from the same cloth as kid-Guybrush (this is really reinforced by the voice-acting). If you prepared for Return to MI not by playing through the Monkey Island series, but by playing all of the adventure games Ron Gilbert produced in chronological order, you would follow up LeChuck's Revenge immediately with Putt Putt, and then a dozen other kiddie adventures. The prologue of Return to Monkey Island then serves not just as a resolution to the ending of LeChuck's Revenge, but a bridge from the bright and happy world of Humongous.
    1 point
  30. I like the idea that the curse and tales recaps are off. If guybrush is an unreliable narrator and, as we’ve discovered, the whole series is a story guybrush is telling, then suddenly theres a whole new aspect to the canon discussion. Now the events happen, are filtered through guybrush’s poor memory, are filtered again by his desire to tell an interesting story to his kid and then are filtered one more time by the kid’s interpretation. A part of me kinda wants a remake of the entire series but just showing what really happened.. and i want it to be really dull. Like SoMI originally was about how guybrush once lost a bottle of root beer and had to go buy another.
    1 point
  31. I still haven't been able to play Return (and probably won't until this weekend unfortunately) but now it's a good time to rank them, since I haven't been tainted by Return and played the other 5 pretty recently (MI1 and MI2 a year ago and Escape and Tales months ago) 1. MI2 2. MI1 3. CMI* 4. EMI 5. TMI I'll come back and make a new list when I finish ReMI and see where it goes. *It almost pains me to put it in number 3, it almost ties with MI1, but just barely loses...
    1 point
  32. Hope the baby is feeling better today @Lagomorph01!
    1 point
  33. I'm dodging this thread because I've only gotten through the Scrapbook so far, but I wanted to post about the Scrapbook. I probably won't even be able to read replies until my kids and I get through the Prelude. 1) Extremely pleased that all the MI games are represented here. Before the scrapbook teaser was revealed, I wouldn't have guessed that MI2 only had as much coverage as any other sequel. 2) Neutral surprised at the coverage of Guybrush and Elaine's wedding, as much as a sequel game! But I assume it means this game will address something about their wedding or marriage. 3) A little bit miffed/disappointed at the CMI recap, the way it presents Elaine's statue curse as an act of LeChuck in two separate voiced comments. It was even to the level of irony, when Guybrush remarked that LeChuck must only see Elaine as furniture - dude, he was vaporized before you transformed her! YOU DID THAT TO HER! THAT'S WHY SHE PUNCHED YOU! I didn't expect Guybrush to wallow in remorse here, but his failure to remember this was HIS mistake... along with the MI2 page showing Elaine coming after him without Guybrush acknowledging that he'd basically rejected her for his map quest (MI2 was the lowest point in their relationship, but it gets an "Elaine is always there for me" or some such)... juxtaposed with the big happy wedding page? It kind of lessens him as a character to me. 4) Though not egregious, his Tales memory of Morgan really dwells on her betrayal without mentioning her role/redemptive aid at the end, huh? Especially since it wasn't technically a betrayal; she already told him that she was there to capture him. But someone who watches this recap without knowing the game will assume they parted ways as enemies. I wonder why the game doesn't use that trailer picture we saw of Elaine dueling Morgan? I wonder what Guybrush means when he says "or so it seemed", regarding the Pox. Maybe that's related to stuff the Prelude will reveal to me. Nice picture of the cat and magnet. EDIT: 5) Guybrush making the prosthetic abomination in Escape is officially Roncanon. Ha!
    1 point
  34. Honestly, I'd feel a lot better of this discussion could be moved to its own thread.
    1 point
  35. Only had the chance to play one or two hours yesterday, (the baby was having tummy trouble), but I absolutely adore what I've played so far!
    1 point
  36. Also, shoutout to how casually we found out the Voodoo Lady's real name. Fittingly, I actually don't even remember what it is (I'm not even joking). And yes, I already have my head-canon for how her role in this game connects to her mysterious agenda from Tales. I never thought I would say this, but I actually don't want them to make another game, at least for several years. This ending is perfect in too many ways.
    1 point
  37. I have a feeling there is a lot more to unpack in this game upon more replays. Upon my third replay of the ending, I realized you could indeed unlock the chest containing the secret and I loved it lol
    1 point
  38. Man, I played that Prologue smiling all the way through. What a clever and charming way to deal with MI2. Playing on the Switch, the controls are super smooth. Perfect way to translate P&C to a controller. I'm still early in the game, so I'll stay off any reviews for now. I don't even want to know any review scores, so that it won't influence my impressions in any way. Going to drop the girl off at the Kindergarten now, and then using my day off to get back to the game!
    1 point
  39. Okay, my thoughts as of right now.... I absolutely loved this game. The ending....I'm going to be thinking about for a while, but I think Ron has quite literally given us the keys to come up with whatever conclusion we are most happy with. I think the true secret of Monkey Island is that it's a series of stories that Guybrush came up with based off his own experiences in an amusement park that Stan owned (he visited it as a kid and always kept coming back even as an adult, married and as a flooring inspector), with Stan tweaking the story and animatronics every now and then as the years went on (very much like the POTC ride after the movies came out). Guybrush used the park as inspiration to tell his son exciting stories. The Secret is something to keep the stories going on forever. Guybrush in his youth was truly an orphan and found solace in the amusement park to become a pirate, met Elaine, perhaps tried to defend her from a bully named Chucky/Charles, though she was already defending herself quite capably. He meshed those experiences with the park attractions. Now then, as for my own personal take more ingrained with the "fiction"; I think the answers you can give kiddo Guybrush is what you believe as the true ending; the answer that I finally settled on (I replayed my save many times) was that Elaine was right and it didn't matter what the secret was. Her cutscenes observing Guybrush's destructive actions and the conversations she had with Guybrush while walking were too compelling. LeChuck, his crew, Madison and her partners, were all killing each other by the end and Guybrush did so much damage in his own quest. I like to think, in the end, Guybrush realized it didn't matter anymore, while LeChuck was enveloped by it. Guybrush has everything he ever needed. Sure, I would've liked to have seen my take with own eyes, but then, that would've only been the ending I wanted to see then, wouldn't it. LeChuck was consumed by the secret and Guybrush settled down to have a family. I didn't need to see one more showdown with LeChuck; we've gotten that 5 times prior. Sure, I wanted to see one again when I was playing it, but now.....nah, I'm good. Seeing Guybrush as a father with Elaine, as an actual pirate or a flooring inspector, it doesn't matter. The Secret was that other things mattered more. Guybrush has that now. @DmnklyThank you. You are Guybrush to me, Ron, Dave, and so many others, and a massive part of my childhood. You have no idea what you meant to me growing up. Actually sending a message to you on the day I finished this game.... I can't believe it is actually happening. I was nine when I first played these games, when Curse came out. The circle is now complete lol I couldn't be happier.
    1 point
  40. Just finished. Played through the first time on casual as i’m going to jump straight back in and leaving hard mode til second playthrough gives a little replay value. Won’t go too in depth as it’s nearly 4am here but what i will say is that I wasn’t a big fan of the way they handled the monkey 2 ending but it wasn’t anything too egregious and it’s essentially just the first and last 20 minutes of the game. I was waiting for there to be a twist on top of the twist and was disappointed when i realised that it wasn’t going to be any more than what was revealed at the very beginning as that felt a little like a cheat. But i think that may have been my own fault for raising my expectations even while playing. by far my favourite chapter was when you’re a part of lechucks crew and essentially just hang out with the other ghosts, zombies etc. Of all the new characters, they were the most charming. I was always going to be disappointed by some of the characters they left out so i can’t hold that against the game. I think they struck the perfect balance between including the nostalgic stuff and the new stuff. Even if i would have stuck an extra meathook in there at the very least. I could talk for hours but I desperately need sleep now so I’ll probably post more in depth over the next few days. Basically… loved it. It’s great. It’s just not perfect. P.S. pleasantly surprised by the amount of morgan leflay shout outs in this game.
    1 point
  41. I feel like this thread needs a HERE BE DRAGONS header, or something along those lines Worst-case scenario, Jake, you and I can just shoot the shit here until everybody else shows up.
    1 point
  42. The explanation they give....I absolutely love it. In a few minutes it neatly ties up the ending and connects it with the rest of the series. So, my take is essentially Guybrush's son is reimagining the stories Guybrush told him with his friends. Each game at this point has basically been them reimagining the tales. Largely, the tales they reimagine are accurate, but they incorporated their own twist into the ending of the second game and take liberties here and there with other aspects (the pirates insult sword fighting saying, "come on, play along"). This game starts with them finishing one of their retellings of the second game, and the explanation given in Curse remains canon. So Guybrush and LeChuck aren't brothers (at least where I'm at in the game now). It fits so nicely because Guybrush and LeChuck never bring it up again, because LeChcuk never said it. Now, it does make me question the whole "dad's skeleton head" now. Beyond that, this game is incredible. And l'm loving the great scores it's getting. Well, done, Ron, Dave and everyone else. I still have plenty to play, but I don't have one complaint right now.
    1 point
  43. I used my thumbs as reference for where Guybrush holds the map on the screenshot and went from there. The Tri-isalnd map measures, 35.5cm x 26cm (roughly 14inch by 10.25inch on 190gsm watercolour paper. Tea stained and "roasted" dry then most of it was free hand drawn. Luckily there's scaling markers on the maps, I started with them first and went from there.
    1 point
  44. If you're still on the fence about this game, play it. I'm so happy with it so far.
    1 point
  45. Husband just suggested that when the kids go to sleep we could watch something on the TV. That wasn't what I had planned
    1 point
  46. An opinion I can’t get behind because the correct answer is “the four map pieces,” but warms my heart all the same.
    1 point
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