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Showing content with the highest reputation on 09/26/22 in all areas

  1. Can i just say some of the jokes in Return have wonderful clues to the ending. For example, this joke reads differently with hindsight!!!
    5 points
  2. Old news for some, but since I'm apparently new to this forum (so good to visit a real forum again!) here are a couple of my relevant Winamp skins. You can click the Webamp links to play around with them online without downloading anything. Sam & Max, based on Telltale's game and their website at the time: https://skins.webamp.org/skin/b30e9850296ec14bd7db0bb222f9d292/sam_and_max_season_1_by_luigihann.wsz/ Day of the Tentacle: https://skins.webamp.org/skin/caba216aa93f4c3d995d6ba7ee03770e/day_of_the_tentacle_for_winamp_by_luigihann.wsz/ Strong Bad (technically not directly based on the Telltale game, but close enough): https://skins.webamp.org/skin/95df60f7546b7e69d5f38ab83d26203c/lappy486.wsz/ Some less-relevant ones in my gallery may be relevant to fans of other adventure games (I have Myst, Neverhood, and several Ace Attorney ones, along with more Homestar Runner ones and a million other game-inspired ones): luigihann User Profile | DeviantArt I've taken a few stabs at a Monkey Island one, but none have quite clicked. Might be motivated to try again now.
    4 points
  3. A little addition from me as well (track markers can be found in the video description). EDIT: New version with track names. EDIT 2: Newer version with tracker names.
    4 points
  4. I don't know if this has been pointed out yet, but I noticed how well Guybrush's arc as an improving storyteller during ReMI ties into how he acts in MI2, what with how he keeps annoying everybody with his "killing LeChuck" story. He was a crap storyteller!
    3 points
  5. As with the commercial success of most of these games, the data is too sketchy to be confident either way. By some accounts, the game sold half a million units over its life, which if true is quite a hit for an adventure game. I don't know that I buy that number. But I definitely wouldn't be surprised if the game sold at least as well in its time as Monkey Island 1 did. I think it's possible that both things can be true: that Loom was a genuine hit in its time, but the IP being left fallow allowed it to be forgotten to the point where its own studio was cracking jokes about its obscurity in The Curse of Monkey Island. Awareness is largely a matter of continued exploitation. Monkey Island got sequelized, and Loom did not. In 1990, I doubt that Loom was necessarily considered less fit for a sequel than Monkey Island. But its creator wasn't interested right away, and other attempts to get a design greenlit didn't work out. When the moment passed, inertia had its way.
    3 points
  6. Yeah, Harness did a great job and also sounded very organic. My biggest fear was that his take would sound very forced, but it didn't at all. Others have said it, but I think a change in voice actually complimented the take on the character for this entry. LeChuck seems lost in this one: his diary shows that he was still terrorizing the seas but unable to let go of his lust for Elaine and his obsession for revenge on Guybrush. His sudden decision to search for the secret again is almost like a mid-life crisis. He's attacking the seas, but still doesn't have control over them or Elaine and resorted to the last potential source of power he knew about. He's in denial on how much his hatred of Guybrush drives him and projects his own obsession about the secret onto Guybrush. By the end, he lost the faith of his crew and killed some of them while the rest abandoned him. He was left alone to fight for what was eventually revealed as nothing more than a T-shirt and was enveloped by his lust for the secret. Guybrush also remarks that LeChuck's ship seems like one giant mid-life crisis, so I think this was indeed the theme Ron and Dave intended to come across for the character.
    3 points
  7. Fun fact: WinAmp is still my current music player.
    3 points
  8. We've been updating TP Explorer to add support for ReMI but its still a work in progress. Proper music dumping will come in the next release, I have it working manually but I done the code to do it automatically yet.
    2 points
  9. Definitely outside the scope of this project but I always thought it would be interesting to have a living adventure game where occasionally you could tell new stories with the same locations and characters via content patches, a bit like how things like MMOs keep the game alive with patches between big expansion releases.
    2 points
  10. Whoa, Maniac Mansion with FMV feels like a very wild idea in 2022...I dunno. Live action FMV cut scenes seem like such a late '90s kind of thing. Do any modern games use them? The idea of using a grainy filter to make the games feel like a low-budget horror film could work, but I think most video game live action FMVs already feel kind of uncanny and low budget. There were some live action cut scenes in Jedi Knight that made the game feel like a big-budget ordeal, but somehow even with the full weight if ILM music and SFX it kind of felt like the game was playing dress-up with the license. It would be a different case with a license like Maniac Mansion, but I don't know if it would work. Maybe they could re-create the sets of the old TV show while they're at it ...
    2 points
  11. I did actually! Return didn’t clock as particularly easy to me - it took me well over ten hours. Return is probably easier puzzle-for-puzzle than Thimbleweed though.
    2 points
  12. I don’t know the entirety of how trivia cards work but the rules I know with high confidence are: * if you get one wrong it goes “back in the deck” to get spawned later. I don’t know if it’s randomly shuffled back in or actually moved to the back. * cards are randomly spawned - you don’t always get the card in the same place - but I believe the possible locations in each room are fixed. * trivia cards are tracked game-wide, not scoped to a particular save. this means you can’t save scum when you get one wrong but also means you can collect them across multiple playthroughs * the fastest way to spawn more trivia cards is to answer them. more specifically, past a certain point the game will stop spawning them if you’re playing with too many unanswered cards in your inventory. so your best choice seems to be to try and answer it right when you get it. if I’m wrong about any of that I hope to be corrected!
    2 points
  13. 1 point
  14. Currently on part 2, and I absolutely need to know if I'm only able to play an hour or two a day and I don't want to spend the next however-long tearing the game apart for an answer that never comes. I just want my life back.
    1 point
  15. The chat on the speedrun discord is being quite secretive about routing, tips, etc. I've done a hard-mode speedrun and grabbed the achievement as part of it. My advice would be: Use Easy Mode - it's a lot quicker (20-25 minutes). Double click to run places quickly. In chapter 4, press M or use the map in inventory to jump straight to it. In chapter 3, you don't need to steal LeChuck's theme, just play it - it doesn't change. The 'alternate' ending by heading back into the caves is probably quicker.
    1 point
  16. Yeah, I should also point out that I very much enjoy Escape, both in gameplay and story. It's just a testament to how much I enjoy the others and not a testament to how bad it is. There are several things I would change, such as how Murray was used, but I still very much enjoy it.
    1 point
  17. 0. Tales, unspoken but I know it’s there at the top. Thank you Remi.
    1 point
  18. 1. Secret 2. Revenge 3. Tales 4. Curse 5. Return 6. Escape 7. Full Throttle, Sam and Max, several other games I'm still in Part 2 of Return, so I'll update if my opinion changes. If I can put The Cave on the list, move it to #1. Maybe the Hillbilly is in Guybrush's family. But I got the message from that game, about obsession with what we perceive as our heart's desire driving us away from life itself.
    1 point
  19. At the moment i'm head over heels in love with Return so my current opinion might be biased and change over time. 1. Secret of Monkey Island 2. Return to Monkey Island 3. Curse of Monkey Island 4. Monkey Island 2 5. Tales of Monkey Island 6. Escape from Monkey Island
    1 point
  20. I haven't gone for this either, but there's two guides on Steam. (note to lurkers: both these guides contain full game spoilers) https://steamcommunity.com/sharedfiles/filedetails/?id=2866331468 https://steamcommunity.com/sharedfiles/filedetails/?id=286760748 Sorry if you already saw these. Actual speedrunners seem to have a community-imposed embargo on themselves, although it sounds like they're already talking in their discord. https://www.speedrun.com/return_to_monkey_island/news/2561 I understand their decision is for the good of their community and agree with it. It is bit of a shame for achievement hunters currently, oh well. Though actual speedrunners tend to use more demanding techniques, I'm really curious as to what details their routing will provide. It could still be of use to those of us seeking the achievement. We'll find out I guess. Just gotta wait a week.
    1 point
  21. Very few, but not none, and generally mostly still in the Adventure/Puzzle/Mystery genre. "Her Story" was a fairly significant indie game played by examining live action footage. "Contradiction" was a quirky British detective mystery done in live action. Throwback adventure games like Tesla Effect (Tex Murphy) and Obduction (in the vein of Myst) made use of live actors in their cutscenes. In 2018 Netflix put out "Black Mirror: Bandersnatch," an "interactive film" that was functionally a choose-your-own-adventure game. So it is rare and somewhat gimmicky, but not unheard of, and depending on the techniques used it doesn't always feel retro. Now, one thing I really haven't seen since the 90s is the Toonstruck-style use of a live action character being used as the player character in a digital environment during actual gameplay. Occasionally a stop-motion animated game comes out and works just well enough to convince me that you could incorporate photographic sprites in that manner, but it is hard to imagine it looking right with a real person. But it would kind of fit Maniac Mansion's schtick. Edit: also worth noting how many modern games since like L.A. Noire have incorporated real actors using 3D facial scans and motion capture. It always still looks a bit uncanny to me, but nowadays you could probably pair gameplay made that way alongside live-action cutscenes without it looking totally dissonant.
    1 point
  22. I also thought Harness did a wonderful job, and it wasn't too long before I forgot about the casting change. That being said, I'm grateful for and really enjoyed Boen's LeChuck over the years!
    1 point
  23. I feel more like Guybrush than Boybrush, honestly, and can just as well imagine a lot of EMI as Boybrush's weird riff on some of the stories he'd been told by Guybrush. But yeah, if I was to take a step even further back... I feel like it's kind of like how dreams you have will incorporate elements of things that happened during the day, things that you've been thinking about, stuff you were doing before you went to sleep, how you're feeling, and all that - and then sort of remix them all into something fairly unique. I sort of could see Monkey Island (the games) as a semi-dreamlike representation of the collective imaginations of anyone who, as Ron put it, wanted to jump off the ride and explore the world, and Guybrush Threepwood as a sort of focal point that gives the world and story some coherence. In many ways it's like something I suggested a couple of months back in the main forum: "What if guybrush is the spirit of the collective imagination of all children fantasizing about playing pirates." but after playing I'd rephrase it to "What if the MI universe is a representation of the collective imagination of all people playing pirates, and Guybrush is just the perspective from which we experience it"
    1 point
  24. To me squaring all this can be a lot simpler if we assume the version of the story we're seeing through our player-eyes is not always being told with one voice. Like, when the two of them are instantly falling in love and slinging terrible pet names at each other I can easily imagine that as Boybrush playing. When there's some (pretty mild) sexual implications to one line I think it's easy to imagine that as something in an older-guybrush's head. Something I like about the introduction in this game of the idea that we might be seeing things from more than one perspective is that it resolves a lot of inconsistencies that arise if you think of it as either just a literal telling of something that happened or as an imagining of a kid in a theme park.
    1 point
  25. In my personal opinion, Elaine was supposed one of the few people who were real, likely either an employee tha found Kid Guybrush AKA Kidbrush adorable ([sic] "You can't be a pirate, you are too sweet" ), or a kid that while wasn't as interested in pirates, still found him cute. (TBH, I feel like the 'older ELaine' was the original Gilbert canon while the 'kid Elaine' is the newest one) The only issue is that there is a HUGE implication that, in case you save Elaine, she implies she is going to "do things" with Guybrush The only others guys we know for sure were employees are the local fortune teller Corina (who also seems to be the ticket seller) and the man running the show, Stan. While Kidbrush likely was fond of the fortune teller, likely due to the over the top spectacles she put up, he disliked Stan's behavior, to the point of making him a con man who always gets the short end of the stick After he succeeds with the three Trials (only for LeChuck kidnapping her). So I think that 'Kidbrush' had to be in his early teens. LeChuck was just a mix of the 'animatroic Pirate' present in the ride, along with his bully older (likely adoptive) brother Chuckie, who pestered him in both 'Pirate Reality' and 'Theme Park Reality' the first game. I can see Chuckie having been defeated when Kidbrush doused him with root beer. Kidbrush had so much fun that, due to his issues of being adopted, ran away, and snuck on the 'behind the scenes' of the theme attraction but Chuckie found him and they made up regarding the constant picking on. Curse, Escape and Tales were likely fun returns to the theme park without major complications, maybe Escape also had a restructure of the park after it was bought out by Rupert Murdock Ozzie Mandrill and Guybrush didn't like the changes. At this point, Guybrush either got with the 'Elaine' or found an Elaine accepting his fantasy, grew up, got a job as a flooring inspector (irony not lost on him) and bcame a father andhe began sharing those adventures with his son. So far, Kidbrush doesn't seem to have ever joined his adventures, fake or otherwise.
    1 point
  26. Will a new MI game garner a similar level of attention and interest as RtMI? I have a feeling that for many fans RtMI had two main draws: 1) Designed by Ron Gilbert, 2) Resolve MI2's ending. This partly also explains such a strong and occasionally emotional reaction to the game, especially its ending. Now that it is concluded with this meta ending, it would be interesting to see how people will react, especially if it is not designed by Ron.
    1 point
  27. Because of my own experiences when playing, I think I can add a bit to this. Jake's final point is a very important one - I ended my first playthrough with about ten cards because I was planning on answering them later. I started noticing I wasn't getting any new ones and I actually thought that it was only an early game mechanic. It wasn't until I finished the first playthrough that I realized that I had prevented myself from getting more by not answering them. So I wanted to get around ninety in my second playthrough to get the achievement of all 100. And I did. Even got some wrong the first time I gave an answer and got those cards again in the same playthrough. The ones I got wrong came up again before I had seen some others, so I think it is closer to being randomly shuffled back in than being moved to the back. Because Chapter 4 is so open, it is easier to get the cards and explain what happened in that chapter. How it seems to work is that when something major happens in the plot, more cards got generated. Most of the time this was a cutscene, but not every cutscene seemed to cause it to happen. When additional cards got generated, it didn't seem to happen in the vicinity of where the player was at. So, being anywhere on Melee Island when it happened meant that there probably weren't going to be any new ones that time on Melee Island. But the other locations (the other islands, LeChuck's ship, Guybrush's ship) could get them. Being on one of those other locations for the cutscene meant that Melee Island generally would get some new cards that time, but where the player was located wouldn't get new ones. So, every time I got a cutscene, I would stop what I was doing and go to all the locations again. Always found a bunch. Not in the same general location (example: back alley) or specific location (example: on the ground in front of the door) any time. But a bunch throughout the world. My theory is that a player could get more than ninety just in a single playthrough of chapter 4 because there are so many cutscenes. Places that the player would have no further reason to visit can get them. Card #100 for me was in Wally's ransacked shop. It was the first and only time I found a card there, despite checking every cutscene. There were several throughout my playthrough in the governor's mansion and jail, even when there was no reason to go there any longer. LeChuck's ship was a good source of them for me, even though it just seemed like Apple Bob was putting them there given how the plot proceeded. The lime trees can get them. That was always my least favorite part of checking every location. The outside (trees, etc.) part of the route to Toothrot can get them. That was my second least favorite part of checking every location because the game eventually starts the player near the gate and then you have to backtrack.
    1 point
  28. I finished the game last night and caught up with as many comments in the thread as I could. I see common themes already, and wanted to post my thoughts about it. I enjoyed the game a lot. It definitely took me back to the feeling when I first played the trilogy in my teens. What drives me most in these games is finding out what happens next more so than the challenge of the puzzles. I did play it in hard mode but whenever I didn't have patience on something or found it obtuse, I went to the hint book. I don't have a lot of time to play games, so I try to make the most with the time that I have and the hint book helped me move forward. The ending to me was very unexpected and I wanted more, beyond an accept or deny choice. It does answer one theory that I had for a long time but it doesn't necessarily conclude what happens in the story that I've been following in this game. Guybrush remembers where he's been this whole time... and then what? To me, LeChuck and Captain Madison are as real as Guybrush (even he is just a fictional character in a game) and it would have been interesting to me to see how they three reacted to discovering that their whole world is an amusement park. Even if it was all part of Guybrush's imagination, I keep asking myself how would have he finished the story he was already telling within that world. (Also, I wanted to save Wally! I still feel bad I left him stranded in MI2 years ago.) If I were to lean into the ending and interpret the subtext in one of many possible ways, it feels that it's a reflection of Ron and Dave's opportunity to return to the Monkey Island world. They got a chance to play with the characters and locations once more until time was up. Stan represents the larger industry that controls the brand, possibly Disney/Lucasfilm.
    1 point
  29. Reading this led me to hypothesising what the original intent would have been in 1991, and how the envisioned 3rd game would have differed from Return. For one thing, the Guybrush & Boybrush father / son relationship and storytelling narrative seems unlikely as the developers letter suggests this is a reflection on their own experiences of fatherhood and reliving on past glory, something they would have been unlikely to come up with 30 years ago. I'd wager that the implication of Boybrush being a young version of Guybrush playing pirate games with Chuckie was the original intent. In this version, Chuckie may well have been Guybrush's brother and the two old people we see were indeed their parents. None of the events shown up until that point would have been anything other than the playtime fantasy of two boys in a pirate-themed amusement park. If this was the intent, I much prefer the retconned ending. We still see Guybrush happily married to Elaine, and they seem to be pirates of some sort. Maybe they did meet on Melee island, and Stan's amusement park was a faithful recreation of this based island on their stories. LeChuck could have been a real adversary of Guybrush, eventually giving up on Elaine after meeting a new romantic interest and giving birth to his son Chuckie. Even the Secret could have been real.. or it was just T-Shirt. Anything is now possibility, which is something the 'Guybrush is just a kid playing pirate games' interpretation wouldn't have achieved back in the 1990s. It was worth the wait to get it right in the end.
    1 point
  30. I wonder if it's less a case of difficulty and more a case of RTMI lacking equivalents to certain non-American vexing pumps, or even infamous goats. Qualifying as difficult in terms of puzzles makes me think of something like Riven.
    1 point
  31. Regarding the lack of Monkeys on Monkey Island, beyond being an inside joke, perhaps it's also an indirect reference to Escape, where all the monkeys leave.
    1 point
  32. Is there a way to completely fill the inspirational pamphlet? The only part I’m missing is "commit murder". Either it means Guybrush is similar to LeChuck but would never kill someone to get what he wants, or there is something secret we didn’t find. I would love to see a secret ending where Guybrush becomes LeChuck, or even worse than him.
    1 point
  33. I (as everybody I guess) love Boen’s LeChuck, but I also love Harness’ interpretation! And I think it’s much more fitting for LeChuck’s role and character design in ReMI as Boen could have been. I thought I’d miss the old voice, but no: For this game the new one is perfect to me. I enjoyed every dialogue with him und often went to LeChuck’s office, just to hear him shouting with rage.
    1 point
  34. I mean, they can do what they like with it regardless of what it said on some marketing material in 2022. It wouldn't surprise me if that miswording was just a goof from Devolver's end. In Lucasfilm's defense though, without Craig Derrick on the case I think this'd be much harder to get off the ground. Seems like it's revewed decently and had solid sales though, and with a pretty tight development time I think they might be happy enough with how it performed to give it another shot down the road.
    1 point
  35. I love this idea! And it really fits in with the whole B horror esthetic that Maniac Mansion is build around. I’d love for it to have hammy acting with C grade actors as well. Phantasmagoria comes to mind! But the whole thing should be really polished, like we’ve come to expect from LucasArts/Film Games.
    1 point
  36. I'm starting to see it myself, actually. In the last few hours I have been leaning more toward the "the two children in the MI2 finale were already Boybrush and his friend" hypothesis. But at the moment I am under the effect of a powerful pendulum syndrome, swinging back and forth between hypotheses. Maybe in a few hours I will decide that the secret is that it is made of people. This is the one thing that prompts me not to look for further logical explanations: not the fact that they cannot exist, but the fact that I have heard developers say more than once "it might not be important", referring to different aspects of the game. Rationality may not be the best tool to use here. Yet ... people have been using it for decades. I don't remember glowing eyes in RtMI. When I heard Chuckie say something along the lines of "let's pretend I have powers" I interpreted it as yet another reenactment of something Guybrush had recounted happening to him in the past. This could also be explained by the fact that they are continuing to follow the "script". As long as they see Big Whoop around them, I think their reenactment is not over. The first element that threatens the end of their fantasy is the man wondering if the parrot is real, and the abrupt conclusion of the reenactment occurs when the man asks them not to be followed. This did not happen in the story told by Guybrush, so the play must end and they stop seeing Big Whoop.
    1 point
  37. I think that's part of the reason. I can certainly suspect that some puzzle had to be solved in a certain way. For example, just seeing the flags with holes in them suggested to me how those flags would be used eventually. In general, however, I think the puzzles were easier than those in Thimbleweed Park, which in my opinion had very logical and sometimes difficult puzzles. During the development of RtMI, Ron asked the readers of his blog what their favorite puzzle was. To me this was a very suspicious question, and I hoped that the answers to this question would help him for his next game. Several replies pointed out that an original puzzle is something that does not necessarily rely on the usual key/lock metaphor. The melting mugs of grog in MI1 were cited as an example. (by Ron!) I don't think RtMI has many of these out-of-the-box puzzles; I think most of them are based on the key/lock mechanism, both figuratively and practically. That might be a reason why the feel to me a bit on the simpler side, which is good for me, because I was more interested in other aspects of the game. By the way, after the release, the icon of the official website slowly changed from a mug of grog into a melted mug of grog.
    1 point
  38. Dang, Monkey 1 had a lot of monkeys and I forgot to look behind me.
    1 point
  39. I took this as "years of experience". She knows how Guybrush is and wants him to change, but after her years of experience with him, she has realized some things. First that he isn't going to change unless he wants to change, so she is using a gentler approach to try to guide him toward improving himself. Second that she can still be supportive of him despite his flaws. I have seen real-life couples get to similar places after being married for a while.
    1 point
  40. Welcome, friend, to a very weird conversation we had a few weeks back:
    1 point
  41. Sure, we all do! But in the meantime, why not compile the best tracks for outside the game? I know I can't wait... Yes, as said before, most of the themes are reused. But the arrangements are so well done, that I can't complain. I'm pretty happy with the soundtrack! Therefore ... here some more:
    1 point
  42. Definitely with you on this... I've been thinking about that ending for a few days (and nights!) now. This afternoon I was literally sitting out on the grass at the park watching my kids play, quietly reflecting on my own thoughts/memories of playing these games. Not so different from when I was a kid finishing the ending of MI2 for the umpteenth time and trying to figure out how to process it all. I feel like there's been a lot tied together for me... yet still a lot of loose ends that keep me wondering. And I'm okay with that.
    1 point
  43. New poster. My phone news app helpfully recommended the site article "The Many Epilogues" to me and reading through this thread has been really interesting and entertaining. I find myself thinking more and more about the endings and I really appreciate what the creators did with the game. My opinion keeps improving. I like how the game gives substance to help with various interpretations of both the game and the series. And I especially like how it even lets the player choose the ending scene based on what is important to them. But the best part for me is the philosophical parts about stories, journeys, the changing perspectives of maturity, and other concepts like that that the game explores. Some of that was experiential through the game, some was directly stated by characters. But now I can see that it all really worked for me. It was a satisfying continuation/possible conclusion to the franchise. The ending of 2 was very thought-provoking and one of my favorite moments in the series. This ending finally surpassed that one for me. I was playing games when the originals came out, but never gave them a chance. I found Maniac Mansion DIFFICULT and didn't play other LucasArts adventure games until well over a decade later. But when I finally did play all of them, I really enjoyed the Monkey Island games. I hadn't even heard this game was being made, but when I saw it was for sale, I bought it immediately. In my first playthrough, I was a bit shocked after emerging into the back alley the final time. I didn't immediately know what to make of the ending. One thing I typically do after completing a game is to look at the list of achievements to see generally how close to experiencing all of the content I had gotten. I had less than 40% of the achievements. I hadn't even realized in my first playthrough that the reason I wasn't getting more trivia cards was because I wasn't answering them. Reading through the achievements, I realized there was a second ending of going back up the stairs. I thought I might have missed a lot, so I started on a second playthrough right away. It was during that second playthrough that everything started to hit. My opinion improved greatly as I got to see the themes and concepts much more clearly. I appreciated the characters more, especially my favorite portrayal of Elaine in the series. I appreciated the puzzles more, especially the Chum story one. After a third speedrun playthrough to get to 100% achievement completion was when I saw the article that got me here. And that blew me away because I had still missed eight of those epilogues. In my first playthrough, the option I picked was that the secret was the friends we made along the way. Looking at the fun playing the games, the great characters with great acting, and the way some of the games have caused me to really think about them, that is probably closest to the truth for me.
    1 point
  44. Many hours later... Here is the first suite I made for LeChuck's ship (Chapters to the different cues are in the description): Happy listening!
    1 point
  45. In the ending, you can take a photo as a pirate, which was also possible in real life at PAX and Gamescom. More generally, the recreation of Melee shown at events was a giant real-life reference to the ending.
    1 point
  46. Had Ron and Dave made this game in 1992, I'm sure it would have been very different. But unless I'm mistaken, I believe the notion that Ron HAD ideas for MI3 back in 1992 assumes facts not in evidence. I mean, I'm sure his mind wasn't a total blank. But has he ever said that there was any vision for MI3 back in the day? Again, I might be mistaken, but I'm pretty sure that never existed. It seems that for those who feel dissatisfied with the ending, there is a theme of feeling like they just wanted closure. But may I suggest the possibility that you're just overthinking it? I mean, there is a lot of ambiguity around the specifics, but I'm not sure how much more clear RtMI can be about the core revelation. The Secret of Monkey Island is that these stories are fantasies inspired by an amusement park. And in the fellas' defense, they've basically been telling us this for 30 years — in ways both subtle and less subtle — right from the first two lines of the first game. What constitutes "reality," so to speak, is much more unexplained and nebulous. Do Boybrush and Elaine exist? Where are the lines between Guybrush's fantasy and reality? What's the back story? How do all of these pieces fit on the timeline? My hunch is that these are intentionally very undefined because — to put it bluntly — who cares? It's interesting to ponder, but at least as far as this chapter is concerned, as they say quite explicitly, that's not the part that really matters. I'm not sure if the disappointment some people experience stems from feelings of ambiguity beyond the secret, or that RtMI's big reveal is hammering home confirmation that the secret is a fairly obvious thing that's been staring us in the face the whole time. (Or from something else, I don't mean to put words in anybody's mouth.) But FWIW, I really don't think there's a lot of wiggle room around what the core of the revelation is. Like I said way upthread, I get the impression that people's comfort with this ending largely comes down to whether you're comfortable with a lot of peripheral ambiguity, or if you really want everything spelled out to the letter. This definitely isn't the latter. But just because an ending is ambiguous, that doesn't mean it can't bring closure. My opinion is that yes, the game obviously and quite intentionally leaves all kinds of loose ends hanging. But when it comes to the primary themes of the story, the heart of the matter, the capital T Truth at its core, it really wraps things up quite nicely while still giving us a bunch of other stuff to play around with. And speaking for myself, that's what I want from a Monkey Island game. I don't want everything spelled out. I don't want a neat package where everything is carefully explained. To me, that hazy, ambiguous half real, half fantasy isn't the thing Monkey Island is trying to work through to get to a destination. That IS the destination.
    1 point
  47. Monkey Island Ranked 1. Secret of Monkey Island 2. Return to Monkey Island 3. Tales of Monkey Island 4. Curse of Monkey Island 5. Monkey Island 2: LeChuck’s Revenge 6. Escape from Monkey Island Ranking all Lucasfilm (and others) Games 1. Secret of Monkey Island 2. Indiana Jones and the Fate of Atlantis 3. Grim Fandango 4. Return to Monkey Island 5. Tales of Monkey Island 6. Curse of Monkey Island 7. Monkey Island 2: LeChuck’s Revenge 8. Day of the Tentacle 9. Thimbleweed Park 10. Sam and Max: DP 11. Full Throttle 12. Sam and Max: BTS 13: Sam and Max: STW 14. Escape from Monkey Island 15. Sam and Max: HTR 16. Maniac Mansion 17. Indy Last Crusade 18. Loom 19. The Dig 20. Zak McCracken 21. Broken Age
    1 point
  48. Ugh I'm so excited for tonight to finally play Return! Couldn't resist drawing a whole bunch of character yesterday
    1 point
  49. I've finally gotten around to gathering all the memo's and letters from Monkey Island™ and I've collected my paper crafted replicas too. I wrote the "legalese" for the rest of the letter. To: Herman Toothrot From: Yammer, Hem, and Haw, attorneys at law Re: Suit against cannibal tribe over malicious tossing of your oars into a chasm. I think we have a case here. We can probably soak them for emotional distress and possibly punitive damages as well. “Hmm. Sounds like Legalese. I don't think I can translate the rest.” Casus contra anthropophagos difficile est probare sine causa adducendi ad iudicium. Ex nostris monumentis monstraris in insula remota vivere solum cum anthropophagis et pirata larvae Lechuck loqui. Cum hic progreditur casus, vehementer commendamus ut omnes verbales et scriptae communicationes cum Anthropophagis desineres. Opus est ut artissimum iudicium de altero iudiciorum trium insularum interesse debeas; Judex PLANK. praesidebit. Should you require an inter-island visit pre case, please inform our office. Any return mail should be sent in the accompanying bottle. Yours Yammer, Hem and Haw P.S. Please allow 3-5 years for reply, the tides between here and Monkey Island™ can be unpredictable. Latin Translation: The case against the cannibals may be difficult to prove without the case being brought before a court of law. From our records you are shown to live on a remote island with only the cannibals and the ghost pirate Lechuck to speak with. Whilst this case progresses we would heartly recommend that you cease all verbal and written communications with the cannibals. You may need to attend the closest court for judgement on another of the Tri-Island courts, Judge PLANK. will preside.
    1 point
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