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  1. As I kept reflecting on the ending, some new thoughts have sprung. This will be an enormous post, soI’ll be truly grateful to those who manage to read the whole thing. So called “metanarratives” have been told before, across various mediums, whereas by placing the audience as the unwilling target of some sort of storytelling, fourth-wall breaking pun, or resorting to the “it was all in the main character’s head and imagination all along” angle. Regardless of how masterfully conceived these “metanarratives” can be (whether in the form of books, movies, etc.), there is inevitably a gap, a distance, between what the characters are experiencing and what is our own reaction to those experiences. A good storyteller will diminish that distance, create greater empathy between the audience and the characters, but we are still outside witnesses, external observants. We can be touched emotionally by the story, but that tends to come down to how much empathy has been conjured between us and the characters, on how much we can imagine ourselves in the characters’ shoes, on how much we can “relate”. However, I feel RTMI takes this to a whole new level, using a storytelling method that is a particularly perfect vehicle for exploration of this kind of thematic undercurrent: the point and click adventure game. This goes beyond the mere notion of being able to control where the main character goes, or how long we can linger in certain places or even the choices of dialogue (within the obvious limitations of the game framework). Those are just the mechanical and functional means of the storytelling experience. We learn, in what I think is a pretty definitive and unequivocal conclusion, that the world of Monkey Island is a plateau of existence, a mental place, a dimension, if you will, where Guybrush finds solace, refuge, escapism and entertainment. I won’t go into the discussion whether this dimension is any more real than the one where his everyday existence is taking place. What seems pretty definitive to me, is that those two dimensions are separate, they are two different things, although elements from the “everyday dimension”, to a certain extent, seem to feed the fabric of the Monkey Island dimension (and probably vice-versa. as well), as the things we experience almost subconsciously in our everyday lives can also feed our dreams. This Monkey Island dimension might have been triggered by Guybrush’s experiences, both as a child and as an adult, in a pirate themed amusement park, as a way to escape from a reality that is either too sad, too painful, too dull or too empty to face without solace. The details really don’t matter. And this is where the “metanarrative” comes to its full fruition. We are not witnessing Guybrush escaping into an imaginary pirate world, as he tries to take some reprieve from his everyday existente, while feeling empathy for his plight. No, we are Guybrush! As much as I ever felt in any work of art, we are indeed the character. We are not empathizing with Guybrush, we are not relating to Guybrush. We truly are Guybrush. We are the ones looking for solace, refuge, escapism and entertainment in a fictional pirate world. We are the ones (particularly in this forum of such dedicated fans), who treasure and look forward to the moments we spend in this Monkey Island dimension. We don’t do it to spend the time while waiting for the train to arrive. We don’t do it because there’s nothing else to do. We don’t do it to fill in the blanks in our daily schedule. We make it a pinnacle of our leisure time. It’s primetime worthy. In those playing hours, we rather be in the Monkey Island world than in whatever real life has to offer , regardless of how happy or fulfilled we feel. I don’t play Monkey Island the same way I play other games. Not even in the same way I play other point and click adventure games. It’s not to reach the end, get a dopamine fix or an adrenaline rush. I play it for the experience, to live in that world for a bit. That’s why I like linger in the wonderfully evocative locations, just wander around the locals, why I look forward wish to get stuck certain puzzles, so as the music and ambiance seep through my skin and become engrained, so as to when we listen to the soundtrack, it will immediately conjure up memories and feelings of those precious moments spent in the Monkey Island dimension. And I know Monkey Island is not real. Guybrush knows Monkey Island is not real. But it is true. And it matters. And that’s why we like to discuss the minutiae of this world, what things are “more real” than others (although nothing of it is really real), why we hang posters of it on the wall, listen to the soundtracks, replay the games knowing by heart all the solutions to every single puzzle. We want to keep visiting the same amusement park, we get excited when there’s a new ride on the horizon and we love riding the same old, well-worn, familiar rides.. And when not in the amusement park itself, we reminisce by looking at ticket stubs, park maps, promotional brochures. And I, like Guybrush, want Monkey Island to be as real as possible. So I keep chasing the horizon, clinging on to every small thing that might make it a little bit more concrete. I want to make LEGO models of Melee Town, the Giant Monkey Head and Woodtick. I want character statutes to proudly display on my bookcases. I want to wear T-Shirts of the Legendary Treasure of Melee Island. But it is not real. It 's not concrete. It can’t be. And just like Guybrush, I felt disheartened when I reached the back alley of Melee Island at the end of the game. It’s time to go home. My day at the amusement park is almost over. No more new rides to try. It’s with heavy hearts that I turn off all the lights in the park. I have to get back to my more mundane existence. But this game gives us something absolutely new. Almost revolutionary. It shows us a Guybrush with a life outside of Monkey Island. And a happy and fulfilling life at that, with a beautiful family. And we realize, maybe for the first time, that Guybrush doesn’t really need Monkey Island anymore. He’s ceased to be obsessed by it. And this is where The Secret comes in. And how it really could never have been something of true importance. It was a red herring all along, a distraction, something with an importance that grew in an unwarrantedly disproportionate manner throughout the years. It was ever only something that was part of the fabric of Monkey Island, among many other things. It was never its raison d'être, never a cipher to understand the whole thing. Monkey Island is not a mystery to solve, but a “reality” to experience. Like life itself. Lechuck lost sight of this. Monkey Island ceased to be a “good place”, where one could have sprawling adventures, meet colorful characters and visit fascinating places. It was all about The Secret, looking for some sort of resolution, an answer, something with which to cover the gaping holes in his existence. At the end of the game, Guybrush is finally freed from this anchor (ohh, symbolism). He can now visit Monkey Island because he wants to, not because he has to. It’s something that adds to his life, it doesn’t replace it. And it has become a pure thing again. A place where he can play pirates, simple as that, only constrained by the limits of his imagination. Stories being told around a campfire. In light of this, the very beginning of The Secret of Monkey Island has become even more perfect. Guybrush arrives at Melee Island not by ship, but by walking through a stone archway, as it were some sort of portal, and declare bluntly and plainly: This is all we want. We are Guybrush from the very start. We want to be pirates in a make-believe world. That’s why we are playing. Even the setting is perfect. How else would a Pirate setting be enticing unless when seen and interpreted by a child-like imagination? Throw any serious degree of historicity in it and the whole thing crumbles, with all the pillaging, violence, depravity and filth involved. It has to be a Pirate universe as imagined by a child. Again, it was never about The Secret. The whole point of experiencing Monkey Island is perfectly captured by the very first thing Guybrush says. There can never be a Monkey Island prequel. There’s no other possible beginning. To do it would be to corrupt it. Nothing exists before that declaration of intent. That’s where the whole dimension of Monkey Island is born. “I want to be a pirate”. That’s the absolute summation of what Monkey Island is all about. At the end, Guybrush (and myself), realize there’s peace to be found in knowing there’s no deeper meaning behind all of it. Monkey Island is a “good place” to visit every now and then. Guybrush has regained the purity of intent shown in that very first scene in The Secret of Monkey Island. The whole thing has become unburdened by overarching narratives, unsaddled by strict continuity between adventures, freed at last from the shackles of having to provide answers and meaning. Elaine emphasizes this by suggesting yet another adventure. Of the simpler, purer kind. And how perfect and crucial that little intervention is. Brings the whole thing full circle. And Guybrush sits on that bench, looking truly at peace with himself (as I see it), having regained the true purpose of Monkey Island. That image is the perfect coda to the Ron Gilbert trilogy. The lookout scene in SOMI as an overture. This is one as an epilogue. The world of Monkey Island is now wide open. There was never a better time to create new stories in it. Purer stories. With more cannons and less “canon”. I became a father 6 months ago. A little Boybrush named Manuel. Like Guybrush, I now have a family to share the world of Monkey Island with. And it has become something new again.
    15 points
  2. So far, my absolute favorite part of Return has been when LeChuck landed on Monkey Island and used the Mop Map (which Guybrush had used on Mêlée Island to find its historic mop tree), and he was somehow able to follow that map's directions to accidentally find a different mop tree on Monkey Island.
    8 points
  3. Hi! I've grown up with adventure games; Curse Of Monkey Island is largely responsible for me learning English as a kid, along with the other Monkey Island games and some Humongous games, which made middle school English class a breeze a few years later, and now about 20 years later I'm still benefiting from that. Plus, one of the reasons I started learning piano a few years ago was because I wanted to be able to play the music from the Monkey Island games. That's just to say the Monkey Island games have had a big impact on my life. I only found the Monkey Island games well after they released, except for Tales, but I've been lurking here since ReMI was announced. Thanks for all the thoughtful, interesting and fun discussions and analyses before and after the game came out, it really made me even more excited about this Return!
    7 points
  4. This is from the pre-release thread but it’s still compelling I think, especially given Ron’s cryptic post on Twitter a while back asking why Guybrush arrives on Melee Island via the arch and not via the docks — something he does again in Return. * Archway? Park entrance? * Guybrush and blind Melee lookout stand in the same place as Guybrush and deaf Booty lookout relative to the entrance? * Big Whoop is Booty Town but also not? And in Return now a seaside park too? * Big Whoop ticket desk is Captain Dread’s ship? * Guybrush arrives on Melee expecting weenies, which happen to be next to the Big Whoop entrance? * You also start Monkey Island 2 next to a weenie shop?????
    7 points
  5. Hi! After finishing Return To Monkey Island, I wanted a new puzzle, so I tried to unpack the game files. Thanks to far smarter people than me working on expanding BgBennyBoy's Thimbleweed Park Explorer, I managed to unpack and re-pack the game files. May I present to you: MonkeyPack. So far this is a pretty bare-bones commandline application, but it can do the most important parts: Unpacking the existing ReMI ggpack files, and re-packing edited files. To unpack: select one or more ggpack files, and drag and drop them onto the application; or open a commandline where you extracted the application, and call it with the arguments 'unpack [path to ggpack(s)]', for instance 'MonkeyPack.exe unpack "C:\Program Files\Steam\SteamApps\Return To Monkey Island\Weird.ggpack1a"'. Game files will be extracted to where MonkeyPack resides, in a subfolder named after the ggpack file. To pack: Select one or more files and/or folders (no ggpack files), and drag and drop them on the application; or open a commandline where you extracted the application, and call it with the arguments 'pack [list of filenames/folders to pack', for instance 'MonkeyPack.exe pack Text_en.tsv Text_de.tsv"'. The new ggpack file will be created where MonkeyPack resides. The project's readme explains things in a bit more detail. I found that if you pack a file with the same name as one of the packed files, and name it so it gets sorted after the existing files (Like 'Weird.ggpack6'), the data in the repacked file takes precedence over the existing data. This for instance makes it easy to use fan-made translations: Unpack 'Weird.ggpack1a', find the 'Text_en.tsv' file, translate some text, repack it, and place the new ggpack back into the game folder, and the English text should be replaced with the fan-translated one. I hope it's ok for me to post this, and that people find uses for it! If there are any questions or if I didn't word something clearly, please let me know!
    6 points
  6. ughhh I literally can’t sleep because I can’t stop thinking about the ending, and trying to think of an interpretation that works with everything we’ve seen. I just really hope that, since all interpretations are valid, that Ron Gilbert won’t shy away from telling us his interpretation. Stuff like, why he keeps returning to the idea of theme parks. How the carnival opening evolved in his mind over the years, what he was originally planning on doing that after MI2. I feel pretty confident that the amusement park was his original idea for the secret, because of the plaque, but I’d like to hear him expand on like, what that meant exactly at the time, how that might have played out. Like I’m totally cool with the idea that there’s no definitive answers to any of the questions, but I hope in interviews Ron will tell us all his thoughts and opinions honestly, without holding back just to be mysterious like he would have before this game came out. Anyways, here’s where I’m at with the story right now. Sorry if it’s super incoherent, it’s like 2am right now haha. I like the idea that Guybrush wanted to tell a story about how all his adventures were really just him at a carnival. (Why, I’m not sure, but I’m sure you could speculate about that. Maybe something from his childhood?) But because of what we know from all the other games, the story guybrush wanted to tell just didn’t really make sense anymore. Boybrush literally lives in a piratey world where Elaine is his mom, so of course to him that story wouldn’t make any sense! In other words, Ron Gilbert had a story he wanted to tell, but all the other games contradicted it, and so this game is the story that emerges from those contradictions. This is represented in the game at the end, when we see a literal contradiction with how guybrush acts when looking at all the cardboard cutouts (like he knew the whole time that it was all fake) vs how he acts when talking to Elaine (confused about what’s going on.) I think Elaine is telling him, “this weird obsession with the original secret of monkey island, this weird carnival thing, just doesn’t work anymore. Let’s put it to rest.” And so you turning off all the lights is like Ron Gilbert symbolically putting the whole carnival plotline to rest, and embracing whatever direction the story wants to go next. To be clear, I think that guybrush’s adventures were mostly all real, with some embellishments here and there. I think that because I see no reason for the park bench stuff to not be considered “real.” To me, it’s the carnival stuff that’s the fantasy, hence why we see the “Big Whoop Amusement Park” turn into a quaint little town at the beginning of the game. As for what really happened when Guybrush went through the door? I think whatever you tell boybrush happened is what really happened, as we see with all the epilogues. On the topic of contradictions: At the beginning of the game, guyrbush tells boybrush that you can’t just mess around with the ending, and that that’s not how storytelling works. At the end of the game, boybrush reminds guybrush that he said that, To which he replies, “I did?” I think This is Ron Gilbert sort of poking fun at himself, and how he used to be so particular with what his third MI would be, and how he’s loosened up. And it (lovingly) pokes fun at the fanbase, for obsessing so much about every word he’s said. The beginning of the game is “If I made another monkey island,” and the end of the game is “when I made another monkey island.” I’m reminded of the initial reveal trailer. Murray: Ron Gilbert told me he’d never make another monkey island unless~ Ron Gilbert: I did? Ok that’s enough for now. I probably missed a whole bunch of stuff. Not gonna proofread this, just had to get it out there. TLDR: Game good, I need sleep. Aaaaaaaaaaaaa
    6 points
  7. Counterpoint: I’d argue that they didn’t ignore it, but that all the sequels are consciously attempting to deal with the aftermath of 2 in their own ways, with the knowledge that if they ever had attempted to say anything definitive, fans would have rioted and punished them for trying. Those teams were all in a damned if you do, damned if you don’t situation. I don’t think they all liked the ending of 2, but every sequel was made in response to it in some way. For example, the original design document to Curse: Mediocre but real example: I dreamed of a moment in Tales where Guybrush hits his head or takes a huge punch from LeChuck and wakes up in a first aid tent, is bandaged up by a nurse, walks outside and is back in the story, and to never mention it again. Not the most genius idea of all time, but I know I’m not the only one who worked on these games and was drawn to the idea of crashing head-on into the dual-layer blurry reality we get a glimpse of at the end of 2, but knowing a head-on crash like that would be rejected by everyone everywhere for different reasons. Instead some games tried to fold it into the reality of the game, some games did their own version of surreal piracy, some tried to acknowledge it but only around the edges. (Anyway I know this isn’t really what you meant. You know they didn’t literally ignore it, you meant they didn’t try to imagine exactly what he wanted and try to do that. I think that would have been far worse than them instead reacting however they most naturally wanted to and making that game. Someone imagining what Ron would have done and just sort of futzing around would have probably created something far less memorable than the games we got!)
    6 points
  8. I actually turned down the music during one playthrough, too. I don't know, the music is great, but it... never lets up (or it rarely does). A bit of ambiance is nice at times. Also noticed... Anyone know what you can do with the image of the chef?? And an interesting bit of foreshadowing.. And I'm sure this must have already been explained in this thread? The history of XYZZY.
    6 points
  9. I’ve been obsessing over Guybrush coming back to the alleyway at the end of the game and saying “Not yet!” It’s such a delicious detail to unpack and ponder. Not so much an exclamation of surprise as inevitability. Is a spell wearing off? A ride stopping? The ending coming too soon?
    6 points
  10. I am not sure if this detail has been discussed before, but I think there is no doubt that getting drunk and hanging on a chandelier can only lead to bad consequences:
    6 points
  11. Exactly what I was hoping for when seeing DALL-E for the first time (logo removal): Still, far from perfect, obviously, but a good basis for further touch ups.
    5 points
  12. Iron Rose and Putra are the standouts for me. Some good and funny dialogue, and they were among the most well defined and developed new characters in a game where my biggest complaint was that there weren't a lot of new interesting characters to talk to.
    5 points
  13. I had to squeeze this wonderful promotional artwork for "Dark Forces" in. Painted by David Grove, this was used for print ads in several magazines back in the time. Interestingly, the original painting was created with much brighter colors, and later darkened for printing. Surely this was intentional, as the art works much better this way, given the game it was created for. I've created several different versions for this:
    5 points
  14. At the moment Scurvy Island is the most important music to me.
    5 points
  15. Just finished the game, mostly found the puzzles straight forward to deal with, but of course there's always one. For me it was strangely What about everyone else? Anything snag you for particularly long?
    4 points
  16. “He is drinking a can of root beer through a straw.”
    4 points
  17. There are a few others in the Crossroads (I can’t remember all of them). There’s the Grog machine sitting there of course, though that’s almost a Monkey Island meme at this point. The boat that takes you to the different crossroads island is initially boarded via a queue system that is meant to evoke the way guests are loaded onto ride vehicles in a theme park (and it has a tiny puttering gas motor and seems to run on a track when it starts and stops). The music is a deliberate callback to the underground tunnels. When LeChuck is killed and the screen goes to white, there is some ambience from a theme park bleeding in under the voodoo sounds. Does any of that mean anything??? I couldn’t tell you because it never felt to me like there was any sort of direct symbolic correlation between these images and any one meaning in a high school literary analysis sense, but it “felt right” to us so we did a bit of it. We had talked about going more full bore and having the grave Guybrush dug himself out of be made of cardboard and astroturf and that sort of thing - waking up in a more explicitly artificial world - but in the end decided to keep it more grounded and less explicit.
    4 points
  18. I had no idea that this was even a thing, but that's amazing.
    4 points
  19. I scanned archival assets for Laserschwert and all I used was this black tshirt.
    4 points
  20. Guybrush: "Somehow it was more exciting before I knew that." Me: "Nuts to that, old man! I kind of wanted to know her name, and now I know her name."
    4 points
  21. Hello! I finished Return last night and have spent a long time reading through this thread. I love everyone's opinions and analysis. Thanks for sharing them. I've got many thoughts swirling in my brain about Return and I wanted to plonk them down somewhere, so figured this was a good place for it. I'm not sure if they'll be interesting thoughts, and it's going to be scattergun, but it might help me figure out my feelings. I'm so glad the scrapbook exists and it acknowledges all the Monkey Island games. I love them all in different ways. Every time there was an in-game reference to Curse, Escape, or Tales, I was delighted -- I wish there were a few more, but I'll take what I can get. I also wish Herman wasn't retconned to not being a Marley, just because the idea of Ron and Dave sticking with Escape's controversial twist amuses me greatly. The opening Boybrush twist took me completely by surprise. I knew I was in for a good ride after that. Murray is a legend. You can never have enough Murray. When Return was announced, I was reserved about the new art style. However, my concerns immediately vanished when I began playing. In motion it looks absolutely stunning. The colours are vibrant and varied, the close-ups are funny and dynamic, and it's packed full of details. I particularly liked all the creatures lurking in the backgrounds. I found a lot of the interactions with Elaine to be quite unsettling. I appreciate this is a weird take, but: Guybrush seems surprised to see her on Melee, her photo with Guybrush is torn, she appears out of nowhere on Monkey Island, she knows how to get to Monkey without a potion, she coincidentally came to fix the Sea Monkey. At the end, where you're going through Monkey forest with her and Guybrush is struggling to keep up with her pace, I wondered if the distance between them would keep increasing before Guybrush is left alone. I was almost expecting Guybrush to have died when he got pushed off the Monkey cliff (with everything else following being a dream) or Elaine to be a figment of his imagination. I completed Return without using any hints and I'm happy about that. For me, it was the perfect difficulty because I was never stumped for too long. I can see why some people found it too easy, though, especially as the interface immediately shows that you can't use/combine items (which I welcomed -- the brute force 'try everything on everything' is tedious). Bit disappointed I didn't get an achievement for completing it without hints. How did Wally know where the secret of Monkey Island was? I might have missed that explanation. I like that the hover text shows Guybrush's thoughts, rather than just the name of the item. That's a simple change but it works well. Scurvy and Terror were nice islands, but felt slightly hollow. There were points on Scurvy's map that you couldn't visit, which was disappointing. On Terror, it had lots of places to go but nothing to do and no-one to talk to. Cut content perhaps? I wish these were more fleshed out. I can't see these becoming iconic islands. On the other hand, I really liked Brrr Muda. There wasn't loads to explore, but it felt lived in and meaningful. I enjoyed the act on LeChuck's ship where you're mingling with the crew, getting to know them, and helping them out. I respect Flambe's dedication to relaxation. You'll never replace Earl Boen, but the new LeChuck actor did an excellent job. Just the right blend of sinister and silly. I played all the old games directly before starting Return and Dominic Armato's voice acting is, as always, fantastic, but noticeably different. There's still the classic upbeat Guybrush, but at times he sounds more world-weary. It worked really well for the character and themes of the game. So many inventory items were paper-based, like books, pamphlets, notes, diaries, etc. I know this sounds petty, but I wish there was more variety in the items you carried. The trivia book was a fun addition, though thought it odd that it spoilt some things -- I found out Herman would appear in the game through a question, for example. I would have liked to discover that naturally. I also wish I knew that you had to answer them to generate more cards because that explains why I stopped getting them at a certain point. I'm keen to go back and collect them all. The music is fantastic. The way it blends between the tracks is excellent. I crave a soundtrack release ASAP. I've never been particularly interested in finding out what the secret of Monkey Island is, even when I first played the original. I just saw it as a fun framing device for a piratey adventure. Plus, now so much time has passed that any answer will be unsatisfying. I thought Return handled this concept spectacularly, with regular hints from characters that you shouldn't build things up. For me, the ending was perfect because it lets you take from it what you want. I'm still trying to figure out what I want. Guybrush on the bench at the end nearly made me cry. Please don't let this be the last Monkey Island game. But I'm content if it is.
    4 points
  22. So I've only played monkey island 1, 2, and this, but honestly, despite not knowing how I feel about the ending, I'm pretty sure this is my favorite so far. It was so fun to *actually think about solutions to puzzles in my head and have them turn out to be correct*. That never happened to me with 1 or 2. That said, I wouldn't be surprised if I end up liking Curse more when I get around to playing it, just because of how freaking gorgeous and atmospheric it is. (and I'm a sucker for frame by frame animation). We'll see!
    4 points
  23. "Dark Magic" is very similar to hacking via social engineering. You spy personal information and can use it to guess a "password" to gain information or to impersonate somebody by "logging in" as them. I'd not be surprised if that inspired it.
    4 points
  24. I never thought I’d see Monkey Island mentioned in the A.D. (a big Dutch newspaper), but here it is! The headline reads: The comeback of the century
    4 points
  25. When entering this thread, the name on my mind was also Lila, but I'll have to think a bit more about the others. I think the connection between Dee and Lila makes sense as well because she turns the Guybrush/LeChuck relationship into a triangle, same as Dee does to Boybrush and Chuckie. Also Delilah is a name, and both Dee and Lila are short for it, like Chuckie to LeChuck. What does it all mean?
    4 points
  26. My simple explanation for this was that Widey is, like Guybrush, so obsessed with the Secret that she follows Locke wherever she goes, to see if the golden key Locke inherited from her mother somehow comes back into her possession:
    4 points
  27. Fish puzzle was a good one. I did the same thing with putting the spice on in my inventory then putting it in the bucket and running back to Melee. I knew you could sneak a fish onto your plate (as I did it with a spiced one), but the leap to not add pepper until the fish were in the bucket took me a bit. Despite it seeming so obvious afterwards
    3 points
  28. Well, I knew I had to eat an alternative (there's popup text for "sneak hagfish on your plate" or something), but my problem was I peppered the fish beforehand, and I thought I'd be able to stock the basket with this and then get NEW fish at Mêlée... but the game nullifies that possible solution. The sabotaged fish will stay in the contest basket indefinitely, until the moment you get replacement fish on Mêlée. When you get replacement fish on Mêlée, the fish in the contest basket will magically disappear. Because Guybrush's fish supply has been changed, it changes the state of fish he has deposited elsewhere. (It kind of reminds me of the Phatt City Library checkout physics, where the only thing that actually affects the "number of books Guybrush has checked out" is the number of books he is physically holding, regardless of how many different names those books were checked out to or whether you gave a book to a Fisherman instead of returning it.) My problem was: I didn't interpret this to mean I had the right answer but was doing it wrong. I interpreted it to mean that regular hagfish could not exist at the same time as peppered hagfish... and when I looked at the hagfish in my inventory, Guybrush felt it was important to tell me they looked like snakes... therefore, a spent a good hour or so on Terror and Scurvy Islands looking for some sort of snake or worm to sneak on my plate.
    3 points
  29. I beat #Mojole #198 and all I got was this stupid t-shirt. 1/6 https://funzone.mixnmojo.com/Mojole/
    3 points
  30. Ah right, he does say that. Legal contracts are still the darkest magic in the Monkeyverse
    3 points
  31. Keep walking out onto it and he’ll start jumping on it. Return after falling and he’ll refuse to walk out to it.
    3 points
  32. Yes, same here, yes this is the most interesting/almost disturbing line in the whole game. I keep thinking about it too.
    3 points
  33. I was unclear! Although my wife has excellent taste (in other areas), she is the one who does NOT remember Back to the Future 3 fondly. But that's okay. The kids will have to give it a view before we can get to the Telltale game.
    3 points
  34. They clearly put a ton of thought into it. Again, it’s just not the thing you want, which is fine.
    3 points
  35. guybrush tells the story directly to me (like this)
    3 points
  36. I think I’d want something that played it straight, but maybe allude to it a little bit. Like, if the game opened with a little sliver of Guybrush narration, the slimmest reference to it being a frame story or being somehow recounted, but was otherwise just a rollicking adventure. I feel like Return existing means a next game doesn’t HAVE to get deep into this if it doesn’t want to, it just has to be aware that it happened, and players’ brains will do the rest on their own.
    3 points
  37. I somehow made a connection to Stan's toothbrush and tried to break in.
    3 points
  38. She had second thoughts about him and Guybrush convinced her that his arch nemesis is not so bad and worth following, so he could find the Secret.
    3 points
  39. I have returned from my spoiler hole. I... uhh... ok... huh... just... gonna read the thread
    3 points
  40. His favourite food is tentacles with daisy sauce. I think it might be random which ingredient you need to go and get but i’ve got tentacles from the beach in one playthrough and daisies from near the monkey head in another. Not sure what you’re talking about in regards to a missing photo. Pic?
    3 points
  41. Nah, the rat is fine. There's clearly no burner on under the pot, and when you look at it after putting the rat in there Guybrush first says it appears to be doing the backstroke. If you look a while later he says that it seems to have left (after leaving some hair behind).
    3 points
  42. I thought about it and could not come up with an acceptable answer. Perhaps the flower was related to LeChuck's diary, but it is unlikely that he used a flower as a bookmark, and the diary has no markings to suggest this. Since it is a yellow flower, it could be a reference to the yellow flowers used in MI1 or those outside the Governor's Mansion on Melee Island. ---- Since I am reading a lot of posts about music, I suggest an experiment. When I first played MI1, I was mesmerized by the total absence of music in some places in Melee. So I suggest you give it a try: keep all the other sounds on, but turn off the music and visit the places in Melee that had no music in MI1, such as low street or the docks. It will make you appreciate the ambience sounds as well.
    3 points
  43. The music you can hear here: Is quoting this: And what follows: Is also quoting this:
    3 points
  44. Nah, I don't think so. I read it as just a continuation of Guybrush not getting any recognition for his dubious exploits. (eg. "I heard LeChuck drank so much root beer he exploded.")
    3 points
  45. One of the best analysis I have ever read about the series. I agree with every concept you expose. I think that is the true meaning of the ending too. You exposed it perfectly.
    3 points
  46. I love the museum guys explanation that they could fix the clock, but at this point it would confuse the citizens. I love these “holes”, to me they make the world feel bigger, and reinforces Guybrushs “tunnel vision”. There are even more of them. There seems to be a whole story about Lockes mom that we only scratch the surface of. Widey is always living close to Locke? What is that all about? My gut feeling also thinks that Lockes mother created the safe, not Stan. I have zero proof. Just a feeling. And I am satisfied by not knowing the answer, but just know that are more actors and stories out there that we dont fully hear until Guybrush wants to actually listen to them instead of just focus on keys and The Secret. I love it!
    3 points
  47. Ok, I guess I should do a new ranking. Not gonna put all the other Lucasarts titles in this time though. 1. Curse 2. LeChuck's Revenge 3. Return 4. Secret 5. Tales 6. Escape If you've seen my posts about the ending to Return, you may be under the impression that I don't like the game. Nope, I'm just having a bit of trouble digesting the final moments and what it all means for me, but it's overall really good. Just not top 2 good...but maybe that'll change over time.
    3 points
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