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  1. Hi! Sorry, I feel like I'm disrupting a conversation. I'm new here. I'm not a native speaker, so I apologize if my English is a bit clumsy. I've been a fan of Monkey Island since I was a kid, in the 90s, MI2 is my favorite game (and MI2's ending is my favorite ending ever), and I've been really excited about Return since its announcement in April. So I guess I just wanted to meet and discuss with other fans. I already preordered the game (on the Switch), and I can't wait it for it to come out. I've been going on Twitter religiously every Monday to see new clips from Ron Gilbert and Dave Grossman. I personally love the art style. It has, for me, kind of weird, in a good way, and unique vibe. It made me feel like I'm gonna enter this strange world, which is exactly how I felt when I first played MI1 and 2 in the 90s. I always felt like RG's games had some kind of Lynchian vibe, and I think this fits perfectly. Anyway... Nice to meet you all!
    20 points
  2. While I've been planning to give Peter Chan's Star Wars DOTT artwork a make-over at some point, LRG's announcement of DOTT Remastered somehow put this on the fast lane. I wasn't really convinced by the poster they decided to include, so I got down to business, planning to offer them a new print-ready version of the art as an option. How could they say no to that? Well, while LRG seemed to be interested, Disney ultimately wasn't. So, here's the result of this effort, adding a much-needed improvement over my old version, both in terms of colors and detail. No more artficial brush strokes and oversharpened edges to suggest detail. I even separated the color channels of the scan to fix the severe alignment issues the Adventurer print suffered from, removing the color fringes and blurry edges caused by that. A few comparisons (at 70% size, enough to show the differences):
    14 points
  3. I've taken the liberty of writing out text for a video interview with Ron that was done by Rock, Paper Shotgun but was locked by a paywall. There's some further detail of the hint system and confirmation of how it works as a mechanic within the fantasy of the game world as well as hints to what the story is (he's still vague enough about it but it's a great tease) So Ron, what has it been like for you returning to this world? It's been a lot of fun! It's been 30 years since I really immersed myself in that world and it's a lot of fun to sort of get back to it. I was a little worried at the beginning about what that was going to be like, but it is just like a comfortable glove at some point, you know when I started working on it with Dave, we just fell into it so quickly. Awesome! So what can you tell us about the story? Well, the story is...we kinda call it unfinished business. You know Guybrush, in the first game even though it's called The Secret of Monkey Island, he never actually found the secret, so this game is really about him finding the real secret to Monkey Island, and I think it's also unfinished business for Dave and me as designers, because we never disclosed what the secret was, and you know Monkey Island 2 ended on this bizarre cliffhanger, so for us it's unfinished business and for Guybrush it's unfinished business. Yeah we were talking before about this huge cliffhanger at the end of 2, so where in the Monkey Island timeline does this land? So the game starts right after Monkey Island 2 ends...and then it just gets bizarre from there. Can you explain what kind of bizarre things we're gonna see? No, you'll have to buy the game (laughs) I love that! So one thing that was talked about on the panel was this idea of puzzle creation and adventure games are known for their challenging puzzles. Will Return to Monkey Island follow in its predecessor's footsteps, or what kind of puzzles are we gonna see, what should we expect? Well it's definitely a point and click game. There's a type of puzzle that really inhabits a point and click adventure, so we're definitely doing that. I think that times have changed, players have changed, we're different people, we've changed, and I think adventure games need to change with that. And it's not about making thongs simpler, but I think it's how you design puzzles. You need to be a bit clearer about things with people, and there are people who don't know point and click, don't know Monkey Island, and you need to kinda ease people into that stuff. One thing we've added to the game is a hintbook, so if you are stuck you can look at the hintbook. I mean these days, when you get stuck on a puzzle, you don't puzzle theough it for a month and talk to your friends about it, you just run to Google. We didn't want people to leave our game to do that, so we added a hintbook, and it's part of the fantasy of the game, it's actually a physical object that Guybrush has in his inventory. And you have to go get the hintbook, it's not something that's just given to you. So we hope that people who do want hints use our hint system, because we can be very clever about the hints, we know where you are and what things you've tried, so we can give you hints that are very tailored to the specific issue that you have. As someone who's had a relationship with Monkey Island for so long, how has your approach changed from the older games to the new one? What's different? I think creatively, design and story-wise, not much has changed at all. We start with a high concept for the thing, down to the individual parts of the game, then below that the character arcs and below that the puzzles. We've always done that with games and I don't think that part has really changed.
    13 points
  4. Had Ron and Dave made this game in 1992, I'm sure it would have been very different. But unless I'm mistaken, I believe the notion that Ron HAD ideas for MI3 back in 1992 assumes facts not in evidence. I mean, I'm sure his mind wasn't a total blank. But has he ever said that there was any vision for MI3 back in the day? Again, I might be mistaken, but I'm pretty sure that never existed. It seems that for those who feel dissatisfied with the ending, there is a theme of feeling like they just wanted closure. But may I suggest the possibility that you're just overthinking it? I mean, there is a lot of ambiguity around the specifics, but I'm not sure how much more clear RtMI can be about the core revelation. The Secret of Monkey Island is that these stories are fantasies inspired by an amusement park. And in the fellas' defense, they've basically been telling us this for 30 years — in ways both subtle and less subtle — right from the first two lines of the first game. What constitutes "reality," so to speak, is much more unexplained and nebulous. Do Boybrush and Elaine exist? Where are the lines between Guybrush's fantasy and reality? What's the back story? How do all of these pieces fit on the timeline? My hunch is that these are intentionally very undefined because — to put it bluntly — who cares? It's interesting to ponder, but at least as far as this chapter is concerned, as they say quite explicitly, that's not the part that really matters. I'm not sure if the disappointment some people experience stems from feelings of ambiguity beyond the secret, or that RtMI's big reveal is hammering home confirmation that the secret is a fairly obvious thing that's been staring us in the face the whole time. (Or from something else, I don't mean to put words in anybody's mouth.) But FWIW, I really don't think there's a lot of wiggle room around what the core of the revelation is. Like I said way upthread, I get the impression that people's comfort with this ending largely comes down to whether you're comfortable with a lot of peripheral ambiguity, or if you really want everything spelled out to the letter. This definitely isn't the latter. But just because an ending is ambiguous, that doesn't mean it can't bring closure. My opinion is that yes, the game obviously and quite intentionally leaves all kinds of loose ends hanging. But when it comes to the primary themes of the story, the heart of the matter, the capital T Truth at its core, it really wraps things up quite nicely while still giving us a bunch of other stuff to play around with. And speaking for myself, that's what I want from a Monkey Island game. I don't want everything spelled out. I don't want a neat package where everything is carefully explained. To me, that hazy, ambiguous half real, half fantasy isn't the thing Monkey Island is trying to work through to get to a destination. That IS the destination.
    12 points
  5. Ugh I'm so excited for tonight to finally play Return! Couldn't resist drawing a whole bunch of character yesterday
    12 points
  6. Mojo: Stressing out Ron Gilbert since ‘97.
    11 points
  7. I went to PAX! I got to meet David Fox!* It was great. * (And Ron and Dave and Dom, but I have met them all before.)
    11 points
  8. You bastards lure me into doing all kinds of ridiculous stuff. https://mixnmojo.com/countdown/ Click the ReMI image on the frontpage and the same thing should come up.
    11 points
  9. As much as I’d love to go back to Scabb, I’m also kind of glad that it’s never been touched again. It’s my favorite one. Woodtick is so perfectly done with its art, cast of characters, and incredible music, Scabb’s locations are all lonely and a touch creepy, the map music is unique in its lonely backwater mood, and though the island seems small, it’s revealed to be full of little secret spots the more you play. I like to imagine that place is continuing on exactly how it is, maybe a little shabbier and a little more sunk into the swamp but otherwise unchanged by time. Scabb Island Romantic signing off.
    10 points
  10. OK, consider this pretty much done (music addition may or may not happen (but probably may)): https://mixnmojo.com/countdown/ Thanks to @Marius and @Kroms for constructive activities additions, and more importantly @Thrik -- our miniature Buddha -- for his strict but wise guidance.
    10 points
  11. I have finished the game. I haven't seen all the endings and probably haven't catch the abundant details scattered around, but I think I have achieved the main goal of experiencing the game for what it is: a Gilbertian autobiographical journey that reminds us how things evolve, including our memories. The one item that struck me and that I've found deeply symbolic is the chest that contains the "Secret." The story of this game functions as a giant metatext that constantly mixes fiction and reality. The treasure chest, over-embedded with large gems to the point of looking cheesy, is the perfect metaphor for how longtime Monkey Island fans transformed "The Secret", enriching it for decades so that its image far outweighed its substance. Although the story emphasizes this stark difference between appearance and "reality", it is by no means an attempt to mock the way players have fed the myth. On the contrary, it should be seen as a charming way to remind players that this biographical journey does not belong to the authors alone. It is a sea voyage shared with the people who loved the games and nurtured their stories until they were revived by the original creators. In a sense, if you are a longtime fan, you helped make Return to Monkey Island what it is. The distinction between what players see and what the creators feel does not stop at the cheesy image of the chest. Both Guybrush and LeChuck manage to lift it with great difficulty: the box is quite heavy. This is where the duality comes up again. The same heaviness that the players use as a proxy for value or importance, for the authors represents instead the burden they had to carry when they decided to embark on this new adventure. "The Secret", now overgrown in people's minds, was a hot potato to handle. In many interviews, both Ron and Dave recalled the serious thinking they had to do before deciding to make the game. Some of the doubts were related to fan expectations and whether the authors would be able to meet them. I think some players do not easily realize how onerous the task was: no author other than Ron Gilbert would have experienced the pressure of giving the original story a conclusion... ... which brings me to my final thoughts. Was it a good game for me? Well, my expectations were very high, and from a writing point of view, Return to Monkey Island managed to exceed them. I wasn't interested in knowing what exactly "The Secret" would be; I simply wanted it to be told to me by the person who created this fantasy world. I was interested in closing a circle opened 30 years ago, and I have no doubt that my quest for closure has been finally satisfied. In the finale, the story touched my memories and my heart in two key moments: 1) reading the plaque at the exit of the park and in particular the text "The Original Secret" and 2) staring for an unmeasured amount of seconds at the contents of the chest. It didn't matter if it was a bit predictable: it was simple, it was consistent with the original story, and most importantly, its role in closing the loop justified for me the chest's enormous weight. And now that all the rides have been turned off, I just need to buy a new super-spoilery Monkey Island T-shirt!
    9 points
  12. I've finally gotten around to gathering all the memo's and letters from Monkey Island™ and I've collected my paper crafted replicas too. I wrote the "legalese" for the rest of the letter. To: Herman Toothrot From: Yammer, Hem, and Haw, attorneys at law Re: Suit against cannibal tribe over malicious tossing of your oars into a chasm. I think we have a case here. We can probably soak them for emotional distress and possibly punitive damages as well. “Hmm. Sounds like Legalese. I don't think I can translate the rest.” Casus contra anthropophagos difficile est probare sine causa adducendi ad iudicium. Ex nostris monumentis monstraris in insula remota vivere solum cum anthropophagis et pirata larvae Lechuck loqui. Cum hic progreditur casus, vehementer commendamus ut omnes verbales et scriptae communicationes cum Anthropophagis desineres. Opus est ut artissimum iudicium de altero iudiciorum trium insularum interesse debeas; Judex PLANK. praesidebit. Should you require an inter-island visit pre case, please inform our office. Any return mail should be sent in the accompanying bottle. Yours Yammer, Hem and Haw P.S. Please allow 3-5 years for reply, the tides between here and Monkey Island™ can be unpredictable. Latin Translation: The case against the cannibals may be difficult to prove without the case being brought before a court of law. From our records you are shown to live on a remote island with only the cannibals and the ghost pirate Lechuck to speak with. Whilst this case progresses we would heartly recommend that you cease all verbal and written communications with the cannibals. You may need to attend the closest court for judgement on another of the Tri-Island courts, Judge PLANK. will preside.
    9 points
  13. And here it is, probably the first Dave Grossman foto since E3 2010. I'm just so glad he's involved.
    9 points
  14. New poster. My phone news app helpfully recommended the site article "The Many Epilogues" to me and reading through this thread has been really interesting and entertaining. I find myself thinking more and more about the endings and I really appreciate what the creators did with the game. My opinion keeps improving. I like how the game gives substance to help with various interpretations of both the game and the series. And I especially like how it even lets the player choose the ending scene based on what is important to them. But the best part for me is the philosophical parts about stories, journeys, the changing perspectives of maturity, and other concepts like that that the game explores. Some of that was experiential through the game, some was directly stated by characters. But now I can see that it all really worked for me. It was a satisfying continuation/possible conclusion to the franchise. The ending of 2 was very thought-provoking and one of my favorite moments in the series. This ending finally surpassed that one for me. I was playing games when the originals came out, but never gave them a chance. I found Maniac Mansion DIFFICULT and didn't play other LucasArts adventure games until well over a decade later. But when I finally did play all of them, I really enjoyed the Monkey Island games. I hadn't even heard this game was being made, but when I saw it was for sale, I bought it immediately. In my first playthrough, I was a bit shocked after emerging into the back alley the final time. I didn't immediately know what to make of the ending. One thing I typically do after completing a game is to look at the list of achievements to see generally how close to experiencing all of the content I had gotten. I had less than 40% of the achievements. I hadn't even realized in my first playthrough that the reason I wasn't getting more trivia cards was because I wasn't answering them. Reading through the achievements, I realized there was a second ending of going back up the stairs. I thought I might have missed a lot, so I started on a second playthrough right away. It was during that second playthrough that everything started to hit. My opinion improved greatly as I got to see the themes and concepts much more clearly. I appreciated the characters more, especially my favorite portrayal of Elaine in the series. I appreciated the puzzles more, especially the Chum story one. After a third speedrun playthrough to get to 100% achievement completion was when I saw the article that got me here. And that blew me away because I had still missed eight of those epilogues. In my first playthrough, the option I picked was that the secret was the friends we made along the way. Looking at the fun playing the games, the great characters with great acting, and the way some of the games have caused me to really think about them, that is probably closest to the truth for me.
    8 points
  15. This may not be a unpopular opinion per se, but this is where this thought fits in the best, I think: Monkey Island fans are some of the luckiest in the world! Why? We have two great games as a base, three really good sequels that are fun and never really boring (you can argue about the story here and there). If you compare that to other game series where there are really bad sequels in between, we've been pretty lucky, I think. And now (TODAY!) we get a sequel from the actual creator, which will reveal the two biggest mysteries of the series. But wait, there's more! In all games we have solid to fantastic artwork, the same main composer with great working partners by his side, great voice acting without replacing the main character etc. And all this over a period of more than 30 years, with no oversaturation (so far), so that every new game was/is an event. Not to mention this great community here! All of this brings me to the conclusion: Yes, we Monkey Island fans are pretty lucky!
    8 points
  16. A small positive news about RtMI: it's currently at position #11 in Steam top selling games. (Source) I really really hope that the developers will feel satisfied with the results. They deserve it!
    8 points
  17. Successfully moved my day off from Monday to Tuesday. Bring it on!
    8 points
  18. Came across this photo in one of the articles I was reading. It still makes me so happy seeing Ron and Dave work together again.
    8 points
  19. Wouldn’t be the SCUMM Bar without closeups.
    8 points
  20. I just did another quick playthrough trying to pick up some more trivia cards and achievements, but it's really the ending that's still on my mind... I've now played through about 5 of the different ending options, and read the Mojo article to look at the rest, but I have to say I've been thinking about the ending to Return non-stop since I originally finished it. My goodness... I think it's going to take me a really long time to process all this! Besides some of the items Jake mentioned above, for me the most emotional part was turning off the lights and leaving... First time I played it I don't think it really hit me as hard as my mind was so overrun with everything, but now the more I think about it I just start feeling really... emotional. I guess for me it's really about realizing that it's all over (for now) and it's back to reality. When Guybrush appears surprised to be back in the alley he makes the comment, "Oh no... not yet!" and the sadness in his voice.... just gets to me. And it's exactly how I feel. Personally, life's been super busy and stressful these past few years, and hearing about Return's announcement was an unexpected oasis of excitement that I didn't ever expect... and something I didn't realize I desperately needed. I've been looking forward to this game more than any game I've ever looked forward to in my life, and even though I've been swamped with both personal and work stuff these past few months, I carved out some time this week to focus on just this - escaping from reality for a few days to go on an adventure as a loveable pirate. Unfortunately, after this weekend (that's all I could allocate) it's really back to reality for me, and all those things I've been pushing off. Sure, both Guybrush and I can always return to those old adventures (and potentially even new ones?) but that has to wait until another day... as it's closing time. <Sigh> I really really loved the ending, and I think it tied together so many themes for me throughout the series, not just MI1 and MI2. If there was one reservation I had as I played Return, it was that I struggled for a while trying to piece together 'when' the story took place. And more specifically, it bothered me that there wasn't clearer references to some of the events from Escape. That being said, I loved the scrapbook and the reference to the 'cushy government jobs', and I felt they did a respectful job with Herman, and by the time I neared the end of the game I was okay with how they chose to handle past cannon. And then ending came. For me it felt like it made everything okay and wrapped all 6 chapters of the series together into one nice big bundle, allowing me to understand that these are all just separate adventures stories that are just meant to be... fun. And that's it. They allow Guybrush (and all of us) to escape from our lives as flooring inspectors, and temporarily enjoying being a pirate. And I'm okay with that. And if this is our last adventure together... I will be okay with that too. Damn... I feel like I've been stabbed in the heartstrings!
    7 points
  21. I read that a lot more positively: the thing they actually love doing together is going on adventures! The Secret is just absolutely not something they share and Elaine sees it as a self destructive fixation that Guybrush should drop. Guybrush in the early games is plagued by this quantum state of believing in himself against all the doubters, and the insane amount of insecurity that comes with it. The Secret (and his relationship with LeChuck) are framed in this game as almost regressive fixations Guybrush has — things that feel like once they enter his field of vision, they blind him from everything else he has accomplished. He finally gets away from LeChuck (for better or worse, due to his pursuit of the Secret) then finds the secret and (literally and figuratively) wakes up and looks around him and the mess he’s made, and has some clarity about what his situation is. I read finding the Secret almost as bottoming out. Elaine warned him on the walk to the monkey head that maybe he was about to bottom out, and all he can really do is make mild to wild excuses for it (while never fully copping to any of her points or the larger unspoken warning/concern). But a few minutes later it hits, and I think hits hard, and the wake-up moment isn’t far behind. But the part where Elaine and Guybrush are traipsing around the world getting embroiled in absolutely weird adventures or helping people solve their very complicated problems, that seems legitimately like things they have in common and is why they work well on screen together when they do. The sort of secretly-shared “I found some awesome map!” moment plays as that to me: the secret is long in their rear view mirror and now they’re off being their best selves, doing what they love. Yes I realize this is a cynicism-free read of the wraparound frame story! Anyway I feel like I’ve repeated myself in here too many times so I will stop until I have a better post.
    7 points
  22. My current thinking is a bit on the darker side. I see Guybrush as a man with very severe issues who has lost himself in this endless fantasy of Monkey Island and the rivalry with his nemesis LeChuck. The ending of Monkey Island 2 was ALMOST the point at which the illusion was broken, but he instead created an even deeper fantasy that we see in the prologue of Rtmi. I think his son and his friends do not exist, they are merely extensions of his own personality that revels in the stories of pirates and adventures and act as a conduit for him to become lost yet again in his fantasy. I mentioned in a different comment that Elaine, in certain sections of the story, acts almost like a therapist, guiding him along to face certain truths about himself. Her very peculiar behaviour when (and if) you choose to leave the amusement park is almost like she is waiting for Guybrush to make the choice to step out of the delusion. I find the scene on the bench at the end striking in that it seems like it’s the final moment of truth. Guybrush is almost free, but there is a final test. Elaine whispers about a hidden treasure and the promise of adventure. Then Guybrush is sat alone (maybe he was always alone). Does he finally break free of the fantasy, or does he cave in and meet Elaine at the dock? I guess that’s for us to decide.
    7 points
  23. It’s crazy. In a few hours I’m going to be playing a Ron Gilbert Monkey Island sequel. It’s actually a little bit overwhelming. I can’t quite believe it. How did we get here? Ron has talked for so long about wanting to make his MI3. Some people thought he was deliberately emotionally manipulating fans. That he never had any intention of following through, and yet the Mojo review revealed that he’d been trying to get MI3 off the ground for years. In fact, if TellTale hadn’t scooped him to it with Tales, we may have gotten it back then. Eventually, after so many failed attempts, he wrote the Infamous Blogpost on a particularly grumpy day. Sort of hinting it would never happen, while also clearly wanting it to. Then so many years later the opportunity to do it finally landed in his lap. The thing he’d wanted for years… suddenly real. Uh oh. The pressure. Should he just walk away to avoid disappointing everyone? Nobody would ever know if he did. It’s one thing to want something, it’s entirely another when it becomes real. He called up Dave Grossman and asked for advice. Grossman and Gilbert worked through it and decided it was worth doing. (So it seems that if it wasn’t for Grossman, we may not have ever gotten this. Thank you, Dave!) The two of them set off and started making this thing. This thing we’ve all dreamed of. And now the entire ReMI team are sitting somewhere anxiously wondering how the next 24 hours are going to play out Good luck, anyone on the ReMI team who reads this! Whatever happens I’m so glad you were brave enough to try! I can’t wait to see what you’ve created. Thanks Ron, Dave, David, Rex, Jenn, Michael, Peter, Clint, Dom, Kris, Devolver and everyone else I’ve missed. This old fan will be always be grateful!
    7 points
  24. Forum News! FYI there will be a spoiler-only subforum going up tomorrow morning at the same time as the game coming out! I'm sure there will be some people who don't want to talk about Return spoilers yet, either because they can't play for a while, or don't want to see any of them until they've completed the game, which is why we'll be quarantining them in a dedicated forum for a while. The forum also has a nice "ignore" function that can filter the spoiler subforum and all of its posts out of your browsing experience, if you'd like. Eg spoiler forum threads won't show up in a "new post" search or activity feed list. Within the spoiler subforum itself we're requesting that people not use spoilers in thread titles, and tag their threads with "Part X" tags (or a few others like "early game" / "late game") so if you do decide to wade into the spoiler forum mid-playthrough, you can choose what you want to engage with. In the meantime despite the temptation, I don't think it's worth "pre-creating" a bunch of spoiler threads, because they'll just get filled with mush in the next few hours while people go stir crazy. I kindly ask that you wait until you've actually played the game a bit and have something spoiler-filled to say before starting a spoiler thread! I think that also means this thread will close when the game goes live or shortly after. End of an era! So live it up in here for the next 10 hours or so.
    7 points
  25. The grog-icon of the ReMI website actually dissolves towards the game's release. Never thought they would actually implement that idea.
    7 points
  26. New arrival (not yet sure how to tackle this one):
    7 points
  27. Don’t know what you’re all complaining about, it works perfectly for me.
    7 points
  28. Look… I’m not saying that I was dumb enough to try and change my Switch internal clock to September 19th to play the game… but according to my sources it does not work.
    7 points
  29. Just thought I'd share my tattoo
    7 points
  30. Nice that we’ll have closeups from time to time.
    7 points
  31. Clearly the solution will be ReMi
    7 points
  32. Obviously, I have a VERY vested interest in what happens with Monkey Island going forward, so take this for what it's worth But one of the things I kind of love about how the fellas wrapped this one up is that I don't think more would diminish anything. I love how they've kind of closed the loop while setting up almost a kind of framework that all of these stories inhabit. In some ways, I feel like this frees any future projects, should we get them, to simply be fun Monkey Island stories, new adventures, a standalone chapters, without the burden of dealing with the larger questions and setup. I feel like it would now be possible for a new game — with maybe just a couple of subtle nods to the metastory — to simply tell a fun story. I mean, it would be tough to top the emotional pull of RtMI. And maybe the best thing would be not to try. But so long as any future adventures are deferential to what we just played, I don't think there's any reason they'd have to detract from anything.
    6 points
  33. Took two days to read through 14 pages of this thread. General thoughts replying to the thread: - I too had a moment of "huh" when I finished the game, but by half an hour later I was quite pleased. - I also found the last puzzle very confusing even after discovering all the clues. Guybrush moves the top of the wheel left and right using right and left motions... and I kept setting the date to 1730 because it's 4 years after 1726, rather than tapping the year 4 times. Ah well. Once I wrote down the 4 combinations it could be, I resolved it quickly. - Did Wally have a theme song in MI2 outside of the Woodtick theme? I figured it makes sense for the map because Wally made the map. - Makes sense that Elaine comes across as maternal in the story, since Guybrush has known her as being a mother for several years by the time he's telling it, and since he's telling it to Boybrush, he may well be referring to Elaine as "mom" in his unheard narration. - If you told me that Ron's idea for what the MI2 ending "meant" involved the kid at the end really being Guybrush's son, I'd believe you. In any case, the segue was impossibly perfect. Maybe the first game I've played where the beginning was a bigger revelation than the ending, and I'm so very glad I got to play it unspoiled. New thoughts from my brain as filtered through other media: - Satoshi Kon's Millenium Actress All of Kon's films are known for playing with the blurred lines between reality and imagination. But Millenium Actress in particular feels relevant, as an aging actress describes her career... - The Lego Movie Spoilers for that film's ending: - The dueling Myst continuities: After the first Myst game came out, surrounding the release of the novels and the sequel Riven, a running gag emerged that the stories were adaptations based on centuries-old journals that had been uncovered, and the events of the game "really happened" in the 1800s. A couple of games were made by another company set in the same continuity as Myst and Riven, but when Cyan made Uru it was set in the present day and the "Myst is based on stuff that really happened" concept became canon. This had the benefit of making it easy to gloss over any continuity issues in the games by chalking them up to "artistic license," but it could also feel unsatisfying, so fans continue to form headcanons for what happened between games in the "game universe" separate from what happened in the "real world." So... yeah. My brain I guess is primed to read the ending of RtMI in an extremely generous way, where the pirate adventure story is real on one level and the theme park imagination story is equally real on another level. The setting in which Guybrush tells the story still seems to be a piratey world, so I certainly still belive Guybrush's adventures were real, in his timeline, but I easily accept that this one was colored by his storytelling flourishes, and it's equally plausible that the previous games were told that way as well. It's also easy enough to explain it all as a series of "real" things that happened, if desired, since Curse depicts a theme park built on Monkey Island, Escape expands on that, and during one of the long stretches when LeChuck was presumed dead it would make perfect sense that Stan of all people would buy it. From there it's possible to imagine that Stan really does contrive wild goose chases that end at his theme park, or just that Boybrush was familiar with the park and Guybrush incorporated it into the story to mess with him. Final final thought: - It's interesting that the game ends with Guybrush silent on the bench, and it's fascinating that different people read different emotions into it. I definitely read it as a sort of "well, that's it, not sure what happens now" vibe, potentially nodding to The Graduate. Which seems appropriate, given that the nod to The Graduate as SoMI turned out to be so pivotal.
    6 points
  34. Loved the game. A collection of random thoughts (will probably have endless more) Boybrush's voice and personality are perfect. The callbacks in the final scene (the stone coins), the huge dial-a-pirate puzzle, Lechuck and the (forget her name, Lina?) pirate recounting the entire series one line after another, made to me pretty clear that we were heading to a 'reality is caving in on itself' moment. Speaking of the ending, the whole game is a fourth wall breaking exploration on the concept of nostalgia and satisfaction (while simultaneously being a fun adventure in itself) so to that level it would have been disappointing had the secret been grounded in some form of 'reality'. Once you learn how 'the magic of movies' works, you can't unlearn it, but you can become immersed in the fantasy once more. I remember David Lynch in a recent Zoom interview talking about 'Rear Window', one of the guests tells him that the man in the corner house playing piano is the actual original composer of the Alvin and the Chipmunks theme. Lynch laughs for a second and then he basically states 'I don't like to know things like that, as it lessens the immersion into the fantasy' Speaking of Lynch, this game explores very similar concepts regarding nostalgia and 'going home' to Twin Peaks Season 3 (a show that returned 25+years after the original series ended), & Ron tweeted that he liked the new series. This was after development on the game had begun, but we know he was already a fan of Lynch/Twin Peaks, so this is a cool connection. Spoilers for the show - the lights go out at the end. 'I'm more button than man now' Speaking of that dial-a-pirate puzzle, it was the only thing in the game I couldn't figure out. I didn't cheat but I sort of had to semi-brute force my way through. I got the spinning down but couldn't figure the date. Was worried that Elaine might no longer be with us in the scenes with Guy & Boy. I was nearly getting emotional and then she showed up at the end. Phew. Speaking of Elaine, I loved her social pursuits & her semi-distant relationship with Guybrush. When I found the picture torn in half and then Elaine was investigating his path of destruction, I legitimately became concerned they were going to break up. It started to feel like a dark message was being brewed and that Guybrush would be made to pay for a lifetime of sins. But nope he just leaves Wally hanging again lol. Genuinely feel a replay urge to see the different lines of dialogue, which I haven't felt for a while with Monkey Island. I think Tales maybe didn't take this concept very far. I'm finished speaking
    6 points
  35. When you finally can use the horse armor (final scene spoiler)...
    6 points
  36. I like this take. My initial impression from March (which remains) was that it was extremely well-written in a very thoughtful, subtle way. As far as the humor goes, there was less reaching for punchlines (stylistic difference, not a value judgement) in favor of a more laid back kind of humor. But those themes, man... very mature, quietly powerful, and expertly woven throughout the fabric of the game. To me, most of the other titles in the series were superlative entertainments, while this one felt like a more thoughtful and robust work of art.
    6 points
  37. Hi all, actual benjoyce from all of those years ago, mostly from MILegend.com! I am also one of those people with a lifelong obsession with the games, starting from the tender age of 9, with CMI being my first game. I wrote my BA (2009) and MA Theses (2011) on the games, comparing the Disney influences, theme park design and adventure game design, as well as the many-many meta-layers of references of these games, sprinkling it with a bit of Baudrillard here, a bit of On Stranger Tides there (this before the 4th POTC movie, too), few kicks of theme park history, and a big dollop of game studies for good measure. I have even returned to the games later in my scholarly career here. And I think I am about to write a game studies paper on ReMI eventually. I think that ReMI is a fine addition to the series, and a genuine iteration of the same principles that made the games great back in their day. Ron Gilbert was into meta for many, many reasons, mostly because postmodernism was in the Zeitgeist and a lot more innocent that the metafiction we get these days. But I believe that ReMI in particular owes its humour and metafictional aspects very much to William Goldman's fairytale adventure novel, The Princess Bride, and I especially emphasise that it is the novel, because it has a lot of textual shenanigans that plays with both the way stories are told, and also the nature/status of fictionality. Goldman's constant barrage of patently absurd historical claims and the obvious fictionalisation of his authorial persona, the numerous digressions, omissions, blatant lies, tall tales, asides, and the whole "found manuscript"/"fictional editor" shtick is very much in the same vein as Gilbert and Grossman's masterful play with the computer game as a (meta)medium. There are several themes that run through Gilbert's whole oeuvre, intense preoccupations and hard-won lessons of storytelling, observations of real life and human nature that go well beyond the MI games, and his protagonists always seem to be "Lost in the Funhouse," to quote John Barth's lovely short story, which, incidentally, touches upon the same themes as ReMI, and it ends like this: "He envisions a truly astonishing funhouse, incredibly complex yet utterly controlled from a great central switchboard like the console of a pipe organ. Nobody had enough imagination. He could design such a place himself, wiring and all, and he's only thirteen years old. He would be its operator: panel lights would show what was up in every cranny of its cunning of its multifarious vastness; a switch-flick would ease this fellow's way, complicate that's, to balance things out; if anyone seemed lost or frightened, all the operator had to do was. He wishes he had never entered the funhouse. But he has. Then he wishes he were dead. But he's not. Therefore he will construct funhouses for others and be their secret operator- though he would rather be among the lovers for whom funhouses are designed." Quite like a game designer's passion, wouldn't you say so? But I don't believe that Gilbert _certainly must have_ been aware of Barth's work (and while aware of The Princess Bride as a movie, not sure about him having read the book, either) but still, they are not essential to the argument. What is essential, though, is that Maniac Mansion, DOTT, The Cave and Thimbleweed Park are also part of this metafictional house of mirrors because they all seem to be centred around a few core themes: 1. The more aware we are of the artifice of art, the more we are equipped to deal with the absurdities of life. 2. The worlds we build in our fantasies and imagination are true to us, but might be paper thin for others. 3. Our personal quests are dangerous things to actually attain, because with the end of our quests, we lose something of our sense of self. 4. The human condition is one of always seeking, of finding new adventures, 5. Putting an end to interpretation is impossible, definite answers to find meaning and to stabilise it is a fool's errand. 6. Excursions, digressions, side-paths, getting lost are an integral part of getting where you want to be going. Sooo, they are very postmodern attitudes by nature. For these reasons (and because I would have accepted whatever ReMI would end up being at the hands of Terrible Toybox), I am grateful for the ride, and they way I eventually want to give back to the developers and the adventure gaming community is to continue to interpret, critique, and analyse this game as the metamodernist masterpiece I believe it to be.
    6 points
  38. Ron and Dave had a long phone conversation with our own @elTee and @Marius. Or the other way around, arguably. It was fun.
    6 points
  39. The guys at Revolution Software, in a Steam news about their improvements on Broken Sword 2, added this nice shoutout to Ron and the RtMI developers.
    6 points
  40. I was considering something similar, but instead having a different drink as I play through each game. Here's what I'm thinking: MI1: Root Beer cause we kill LeChuck with it Mi2: Either a green alcoholic drink or Mountain Dew to represent the spit and the mixed drinks MI3: Lemonade like Kenny's (but without the bottomless mug) MI4: Coffee cause of Starbucaneers MI5: Orange juice to represent the acidic Ichor that Moose drinks
    6 points
  41. If you squint and turn your head they look like ghost bunnies.
    6 points
  42. Oh my god the brief fan obsession with “Tales is Monkey Island 6 and there is a secret 5th game” during the lead up to Tales drove me absolutely insane. All we wanted to say was, the characters had some adventures between Escape and now, to give the world some time to reset and heal. 2, 3, and 4 seemed to have taken place back to back to back, and it was clearly more weight than the MI universe could really bear and everything was starting to get really creaky, so we wanted to give the universe a break. Oh well. People REALLY don’t like it when there are holes in canon, I guess. (I LOVE holes in canon, that’s where my imagination as a fan can have a home in the work, a bunch of weirdly shaped gaps and grooves to run my mind over, but I feel like I’m increasingly in the minority with that preference.) If it helps, I can finally tell you as one of the designers on the game that Tales is Monkey Island 5.
    6 points
  43. I, too, am awaiting the return of Hugo, the perfume salesperson. I think it'll be a while. :~
    6 points
  44. Hi all, has been an extremely busy month at my end and haven't had time to post about the newest developments of ReMI! Will just do a rundown: - September 19th! Amazing! Congrats to all who predicted correctly. Logical deduction wins again! - Jess Harnell as LeChuck... honestly isn't really doing it for me, but I think I can get used to it. Harnell is an fantastic talent and is excellent at comedic acting in particular, but Boen... his deep, gravelly voice just naturally lent itself to LeChuck, and he had the perfect blend of humour and dread that the character needed. As far as perfect casting goes, across any media, he's well up there for me. From the very small amount we've seen so far, this LeChuck just seems so... feeble by comparison. Where Boen felt natural, this feels like a performance, and I don't buy him as a threat yet. Forget the artstyle, I thought *THIS* would be the main reason for backlash if anything, but most people seem to be fine with it. Like I said, I think I'll get used to it over the course of the game, but I just can't help wishing that we could've got Earl back one last time, just to complete the ensemble if anything. - BUT... Jess Harnell being in the game means that we'll almost certainly have him back as the storekeeper too. Same with Rob Paulsen, now that we've seen Bob on LeChuck's ship. - Neil Ross is back as Wally! Excellent! It really looks like they've made an effort to keep the cast consistent from the rest of the series. I think that just leaves Otis now in terms of if the "main" returning characters have their returning actors. (It occurs to me that we haven't seen Meathook yet. Or Smirk. Wonder if they're still around being on Melee and all.) With both Ross and Delk, however, I can definitely hear the age in their voices compared to the older games, but of course, that's unavoidable, and I'd never consider recasting. (Also, does it bother anyone else that Murray doesn't make the "teeth-chattering" noise when he speaks? It was in all of the other games, so it feels strange that it's missing here.) - Glad that we have Gavin Hammond as Stan back. Originally, I was thinking it would be better for consistency to have Pinney from MI1/2, but if the majority of the game does take place after Tales, as we're predicting, then him sounding as he did in Tales may be the best option. He was probably also the best blend of all of the elements of Stan for me, though I do really like Pinney as well. - The interface looks amazing. I *love* what the context sensitive interface ended up being. The inner-thoughts are a fantastic addition, both in terms of the players' connections to the main character, and to provide additional context and background to the story. - As far as canon goes, Ron recently stated (or perhaps tweeted) that the games that you need to play before ReMI are 1 and 2, and if you have time, Curse. Ron also said that those were the only games he played before working on ReMI. I really get the impression that they've made an active effort to keep Curse canon, and if the boot fits for EMI and Tales, great, but they aren't actively pushing to fit them into the mould of ReMI. Already going to predict that they aren't going to acknowledge any of the robot/grandpa stuff here. - Finally... a few observations about a potential timeframe. Wally mentions that he spent "years in therapy" in ReMI, and at the beginning of Curse, Guybrush says to Wally "The last time I saw you, we were prisoners in LeChuck's dungeon" referring to MI2. Both of these add more weight to the idea that the majority of the post-carnival game takes place after Tales. Also, Stan being trapped in the coffin in MI2 and let out in Curse also makes me doubt his ReMI scenes, at least, take place in between those games. That's all I can think of for now, but I am now officially in the process of replaying the original games! Will update the thread when I've finished them all. Two weeks to go!
    6 points
  45. Objection! Please take a look at these two excerpts from the "Monkey Head" script and the "Church" script. Both clearly refer to the monkey as Jojo! EXCERPT FROM THE MONKEY HEAD SCRIPT: (...) script jojo-open-gate { cut-scene { class-of nose-up is UNTOUCHABLE sleep-for 1 second stop-script jojo-follow walk selected-actor to 699,126 walk jojo to-object nose-up wait-for-actor selected-actor do-animation selected-actor turn-left break-here 2 wait-for-actor jojo (...) EXCERPT FROM THE CHURCH SCRIPT: (...) do-animation jojo turn-seductively-around break-here 11 sleep-for 1 second do-animation jojo eat-bouquet break-here 26 sleep-for 1 second do-animation jojo disrobe break-here 8 draw-object wedding-dress do-animation jojo jump-up-and-down sleep-for 1 second say-line selected-actor "What?" (...) How can Jojo hang at the totem and be in the church at the same time?
    6 points
  46. That looks and specially "feels" fantastic. From what we've seen thus far, this really feels like an amalgamation of a lot of previous styles in the MI games. Premature as it might be at this point, this might be my favorite look of a Monkey Island game
    6 points
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