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The Da Vinci Code


Was it a good book?  

20 members have voted

  1. 1. Was it a good book?

    • Yes, a quality novel
      8
    • Yes, a quality novel and enlightening
      3
    • No, it offended me
      0
    • No, it has a lot of historical inaccuracies
      3
    • No, it wasn't quality literature
      6


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Making your comment opinion as well :D

 

I would love to back up my comments but I fear that would begin a religious debate and since you kindly asked that we do not, I won't. In the mean time, I think it's safe to agree that Christianity (just like any other religion) is a set of myths. That point is central to the plot of the book/movie being discussed (hence my earlier comment).

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@ igyman

Sorry if i offended you in anyway too...it's your opinion, and i have no right to comment on that. I just wanted to make clear that everyone has to make his own choises in the matter...

 

@ Topic

Im visiting the cinema tonight, for the movie. Shall i report about it tomorrow?

I've heared that they left some stuff out, regarding the book.

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Im visiting the cinema tonight, for the movie. Shall i report about it tomorrow?

I've heared that they left some stuff out, regarding the book.

actually, one of my problems with the movie is that they tried to cram so much of the novel into the movie. parts of it could've been left out for the sake of time and simplicity without affecting the overall storyline. but they didn't, so the movie suffers as a result.
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In the mean time, I think it's safe to agree that Christianity (just like any other religion) is a set of myths. That point is central to the plot of the book/movie being discussed (hence my earlier comment).

 

Thank you very much!! Hopefully we'll be able to leave it at that.:D

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^ They did. Nothing that'll make you go zOMG 7|-|475 \/\/R0|\|6!!!!11!!!, though. There's only one cryptex, and the cop (whose name escapes me at the moment) is confirmed to be Opus Dei.

That's not right. "The Bull" as the cop is nicknamed was never associated with Opus Dei. The book says that he was devotely religious and in fact wears the thirteen stone crucifix to prove it. His name name is Bezu Fache and he works for the Central Directorate Judical Police, the French equivalent of the US FBI or something like that.

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I think it's safe to agree that Christianity (just like any other religion) is a set of myths.

I think it's safe to say that this comment is more than a little dismissive.

 

Since you probably refer to the Bible, one of a very few common links between all Christian groups, I suggest we examine it as two books: The Old Testament and the New Testament.

 

The Old Testament is best described as part written form of an aural history dating back several thousand years at least, part theological text describing future events and/or meditating on the nature of God and the world. Most of the events contained therein can be held parallel with historical events known to have taken place - for example, the flight of the Israelites from Egypt is marked on a stela from the time of the Pharaoh Merneptah, as well as being in the Torah/OT. Since myths are generally about the past, the visions and meditations cannot be seen as myths.

 

The New Testament is possibly best divided into three: The Gospels and the Acts of the Apostles, the Epistles, and the Book Of Revelation.

 

The Gospels chart the life and death (and life after death) of a teacher known as Jesus of Nazareth. It is known that there was a teacher known as Jesus of Nazareth in first century Palestine (see Josephus and Pliny), and Pliny records (IIRC) that he was crucified. We know that a man known as Pontius Pilatus was prefect of Judaea at that time, and we know that from 18-36 AD, a man called Yehosef Bar Qayyafa (which was transliterated into Greek as "καϊάφας", which in turn was transliterated into the Roman alphabet as "Caiaphas"), was High Priest, and was the son of a man named Annas. Bible and external evidence seem to dovetail quite nicely so far, no?

 

The Letters are largely instructions on how to behave to the various Churches, and so it's probably not necessary to discuss these. Acts of the Apostles is about how the Apostles went out and preached and converted, and how some of them met their untimely ends (Anti-Christian sentiment being a favourite of the Emperors - chap named Nero was particularly typical in his behaviour towards Christians, in fact).

 

Revelation - who knows? Part prophecy of events soon to come, part about the far future, you could debate this book for several lifetimes. The earliest science fiction or a portrayal of the last days before the Second Coming...but a myth? Myth generally refers to a story about the past.

 

So your assertion that Christian belief is based on myths is rather unfounded, besides being derogatory to boot.

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And we were asked nicely to drop the religious discussion. But OK, Darth InSidious, let's look at it this way - you as a believer consider the Bible a book based more on historical events (if I understand correctly) and Achilles and I consider it a book of myths. Everyone is entitled to an opinion, let's leave it at that.

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Okay guys, just a reminder:

 

I know The DaVinci Code moves on some slippery slopes because people have various ideas and concepts about religion, which we have to respect.

 

So from now, please don't make any comments on whether you consider the bible, the quoran or any other founding text of a religion myth or fact.

 

We can all consider us fortunate to live in countries where everyone is entiteld to his own religious beliefs; let's keep it that on this board :)

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