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Danish Animal Bordellos... apparently it's okay


Good Sir Knight
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http://www.aftenposten.no/english/local/article1458080.ece

 

Should Norway's laws be changed?

 

Perhaps Dagobahn can tell us what opinion Norwegians have of animal sex?

 

To tell you the truth, I don't know much about it. Perhaps it isn't a bad thing though I couldn't imagine it being a 'good thing'.

 

I just haven't looked into it. Should this type of thing be legal?

 

You tell me.

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A-a-nd Nancy submits the first well-thought-out posts of the thread.

 

(I'm slightly surprised that a topic is started on this, ignoring our idiotic "justice system"'s civil rights abuse and disrespect towards sexual abuse victims. It would appear that to Good Sir Knight, unborn babies and animals rank higher than us humans. But that's off-topic, I suppose)

 

Perhaps Dagobahn can tell us what opinion Norwegians have of animal sex?
Or you could read the article, which you obviously haven't.

 

First of all, it discusses Danish "bordellos", not Norwegian ones (for you information, Denmark and Norway are separate countries, much like the US and Mexico). Furthermore, the article quotes a good deal of people against the animal sex. It's not socially accepted.

 

Holy ****. How the **** does a civilized country not outlaw beastiality?
It's a loophole, as it says in the article. Laws aren't that easy to change.

 

"The animals want sex"
Says the bordello owners. If you visit a child brothel in Thailand, you'll probably be told the children want sex, too.

 

Reading on: "It could be that the animals don't really care," Knævelsrud said. "But I think it is in the nature of the case that animals will often be victims of injury, stress or suffering in connection with sexual acts with humans. Either that they are held fast, or frightened, or suffer pain or physical injury," Knævelsrud said.

 

Yeah, sure, no problem in Norway with animal sex:rolleyes:.

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Not only did the OP get the wrong country (one wonders if his intent was discussion or simply baiting Dag. Eagle) in the title of the thread, but the opening post falls face first in a mess of logical fallacy. Mostly non sequitur.

 

That a Norwegian Newspaper has a story on Danish animal bordellos in no way implies that Norwegians think the matter "okay" any more than the citizens of Oregon or New Jersey think the matter to be "okay." Norway, Oregon, and New Jersey are each without laws that prohibit bestiality. Many countries are without such laws.

 

Indeed, the very fact that a Norwegian reporter and news organization is willing to question the matter and report that there is new legislation under way that may address the issue might even indicate that many Norwegians find the matter as anything but okay.

 

At any rate, I've updated the title of the thread for accuracy (since Norway doesn't appear to have these 'bordellos').

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Thank you, Skinwalker. Excellent post.

 

I also wonder where Good Sir Knight got this article from. I assume he is not a frequent reader of Aftenposten, so it's likely that he got it from some outraged poster somewhere else on the Web, and passed it on to this board without thinking. There's a lot of that going around on the Internet nowadays.

 

Either way, he is very likely better off fighting Norwegian human rights violations (oh, that's right, they're just humans:rolleyes: ):

Freedom of expression is enshrined in paragraph 100 , Freedom of religion in paragraph 2 of the Constitution of Norway, though many consider this compromised in practice by the establishment of a state church. The press is not censored, but most editors adhere to self-imposed commandments of caution ("Vær Varsom-plakaten"). Public radio and TV broadcast mostly without interference from the government, although permission to broadcast depends on the programme spectrum.

 

The constitution forbids retroactive laws, punishment not based on laws and court decisions, and the use of torture. In 1999 the Human Right conventions of the United Nations and the Council of Europe were constituted as law in Norway, Menneskerettsloven. However, Norwegian Lawyers as well as the Council of Europe's Committee Against Torture have expressed their concern about unwarranted imprisonment of criminal defendants and the use of solitary confinement in Norway, deeming it torture. Also the treatment of refugees has been under discussion.

 

In 2005 the international conventions against discrimination of women and race discrimination were incorporated in, but not superior to, Norwegian law. Amnesty International has recently focused on violence against women in Norway and shortage of public services to victims of violence. The law that says that a person is innocent till the opposite is proven, does not count when it comes to racism, where the burden of evidence lays on those who are accused or racism. Which means they have to prove they are innocent.

 

Norway has mandatory military service of 9-12 months for men between the ages of 18 (17 with parental consent) and 44. Conscientious objectors serve 12 months in an alternative civilian national service. If a candidate refuses to attend the check-up ("sesjon") they are liable to prosecution. If convicted, the objector is a prisoner of conscience by international standards[citation needed].

 

Practising homosexuality was officially legalised in 1972; homosexual partnerships in 1993. According to Statistisk sentralbyrå (SSB) there were 192 homosexual partnerships recorded in 2004. Since 2002 it has become possible for homosexual partners to adopt each other's children from previous relationships, although joint adoption is still not allowed.

--Wiki

 

"On the Internet, Danish animal owners advertise openly that they offer sex with animals, without intervention from police or other authorities", Danish newspaper 24timer reports.
And on the same Internet (think Kazaa), people openly submit child pornography and pictures of naked people taken and submitted without their consent

 

- without significant intervention from the law.

 

I assume that means child porn is accepted by the majority of people in the world, then [/sarcasm]?

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Kazaa? I remember that, friend of mine used to entrsp pedophiles there, he offered various images he said depicted child rape, mutilation, ect (it was really just the FBI logo) and then report their usernames. Apparently the athorities are meant to be able to crack down on file sharing programs now and hunt down those who have illegal content.

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And on the same Internet (think Kazaa), people openly submit child pornography and pictures of naked people taken and submitted without their consent

 

- without significant intervention from the law.

 

I assume that means child porn is accepted by the majority of people in the world, then [/sarcasm]?

 

Yeah, child porn is one of those things that'll really raise my hackles, but that's another thread.

 

I say report the 'animal bordellos' to PETA while working on getting laws passed against this. I'm betting they'd love to go stomp on that for awhile.

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Thank you, Skinwalker. Excellent post.

 

I also wonder where Good Sir Knight got this article from. I assume he is not a frequent reader of Aftenposten, so it's likely that he got it from some outraged poster somewhere else on the Web, and passed it on to this board without thinking. There's a lot of that going around on the Internet nowadays.

 

Either way, he is very likely better off fighting Norwegian human rights violations (oh, that's right, they're just humans:rolleyes: ):--Wiki

 

And on the same Internet (think Kazaa), people openly submit child pornography and pictures of naked people taken and submitted without their consent

 

- without significant intervention from the law.

 

I assume that means child porn is accepted by the majority of people in the world, then [/sarcasm]?

 

How is all this relevant to his questions?

 

Note that I'm not advocating anything, I think the dude is a troll but you seem to love making "politician" posts; big long posts that say a lot but don't say much at all if you get what I mean.

 

Sorry for being stupid.

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