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So... what are you reading right now?


Pavlos
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  • 1 month later...
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@Sabre: funny, I just read a book about how TV makes us incapable of, well, pretty much anything serious. Amusing ourselves to death by Neil Postman, it was written in 86, and while it's easy to laugh at some of his predictions (computers comes to mind), the guy has a point.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Phantom of the Opera, Gaston Leroux. Surprisingly fun read, considering the era and the fact that it's translated from French. For some reason, I'm imagining everything in it through an anime format. Maybe it's too much Le Chevalier d'Eon.

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I read Phantom of the Opera a long time ago in grade school. 4th grade I think. It is a good story.

 

Right now though in studying for my comp exams in order to complete my MA degree, I am refamilarizing myself on Paul Schrader's work on Film Noir. Also Stam's work on montage and some readings on psychoanalysis in film. Pretty busy days for me.

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I'm currently reading Bloodfeud, which sounds a bit like an airport novel but is actually a superbly researched narrative history of 11th century England by Professor Richard Fletcher, a truly remarkable scholar who is regrettably no longer with us.

 

Drawing the narrative together is the concept of feuding factions (something central to all early Germanic cultures) and how they fuelled the political turbulence of the early/mid 11th century: at least four full-scale invasions, the loss of Cumbria to the Scots, and nine kings in the space of seventy years.

 

Like everything Fletcher seems to have done, it is written in a wonderfully accessible style, so if anyone's interested in this particular period of Northern European history, I couldn't imagine a better introduction.

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Charlie Sheen's Biography.

 

n'aww. I wish :p

 

Odd, considering you hate American humour. :raise:

 

Currently reading a book about General Paul Emil von Lettow-Vorbeck, the only 'undefeated' German officer of the First World War, and the only one to invade British Territory.

 

And his response, in later life, to Hitler's offer of the post of Ambassador to Great Britain is classic. It was reportedly 'Go **** yourself'. :D

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"At Home: A short history of Private Life" by Bill Bryson. Bryson does a good job at condensing complicated subjects down to more understandable levels. I also read "A Short History of Nearly Everything" which not only looks at the history of Earth, but also at the study of that history.

 

Also, "The Count of Monte Cristo." I just got the Amazon Kindle app, there are a ton of free books, mostly classics. It is quite possibly the greatest thing ever.

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