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Are there more people like me on this world?


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When I was younger and went to school I played so many games such as LSL, KQ, SQ series ect and the time was going slow and I liked that.

 

14 years further in time and my age is getting higher fast.

 

Now I am 28 and I almost can not play a game because there is no time.

If I CAN play a game then when I look at my clock then the hours has past (4 a 5 hours further) in a split second!

 

How can this be I had much much much more time in my younger years and the time was not as fast as now.

 

does this happen to more people or do I live in a twilightzone world?

 

SAR

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This is a common ailment which has as much to do with our perception of time as a youngster, as it does with the increasingly hectic schedule we all have to deal with the older (and more responsible? haha) we get.

 

It's like going back to the house you grew up in, or the neighborhood you roamed as a kid, and it all looks so small.

 

I find that I have to buy-out time from something else to game, and since I don't want to sacrifice family-time, I'm usually taking from sleep-time. Which is not a good thing, but hey, I get to game, so I'm not complaining. Perhaps when it catches up to me one day, and I'm hospitalized for lack of melatonin and severe depression, they'll supply me with a laptop. ;)

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I'm starting to slowly get that same problem. There just isn't enough time!

Ok, I have enough time for some games but when you have tens of games just waiting to be played you can easily get frustrated.

At this point you can choose if you want to be controlled by the games and play them, or you can take control of your life and toss the games out the window. :D

 

The thing is, I like to be controlled by games! :D so therefore I play them (as many as I have time to anyways).

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I'm only 18 and in college, so I'm sure mine is not the same situation as that of those older than I, but I too am finding I rarely have as much time to play games as I used to. In the last few years, the only games I've played are D2 and a few adventures. D2 I haven't played for about a year and as far as I can remember I've only played one game so far this year. And yet, here I am reading and posting on an adventure GAME forum. Go figure.

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Oh, that's one of the commoness feelings. All feel like that...:)

 

It's one usual way the brain works...Have fun...time "passess" quick. Have un-fun (:p) seconds are hours...

 

And also when you remember something(past)its always..remembering (mostly)the good times....

 

Been there

done that...

:cool:

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Originally posted by Aranolorion

you guys think you got it bad? i aint got the time to make the damn games.

 

That's cuz you're not being paid to make 'em yet, hon. ;)

 

Novel_T's take on it about our perceptions of time is only one part of the equation. There are also the factors of personal and non-personal responsibilities that simply accumulate the older you get. When you were a kid your parents provided for all your day-to-day needs so you weren't the one having to work 40+ hours a week, going grocery shopping, paying bills, maintaining the house, planning activities, etc. So of course it seemed like there was a lot of time to game, to play, to bum around - there was. In fact, when you were a kid the concept of time - having too much or too little of it - never even figured in, did it?

 

It seems priorities become inextricably intertwined with time as you get older - cramming for that exam at uni, partying the night before your very first serious job interview, trying to get everything packed to move into your very first studio apartment in the city. However, the small interstices between these priorities - down time - never really went away, they were always there. It's all in how you've designed your life that moves and shifts time, or your perception of it. When you choose to lump your weekly plans on top of each other, of course you'll feel like you don't have enough time. The less you try to cram so much events into your life, the more space the truly important events can take up - family, reflective strolls along the lakefront, a coffee with croissant, a few hours of Gabriel Knight 3 - and time seems to extend for you, or more accurately, your sense of time will feel much more like when you were a kid. ;)

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I actually wrote a short article... well, a short piece of text, really which talks about the problems internet-based game development teams face. When Curves is finished, I'll upload it somewhere. It's guaranteed quality from a literary genius...

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I can definately relate. When I was a kid (or up to about age 15/16 really), all I basically wanted to do was play games/surf the net. Definately spent hours upon hours in that pursuit and it did feel like there was a lot more time for games back then. Glad I experienced it when I did/was able to.

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When I was a kid (or up to about age 15/16 really), all I basically wanted to do was play games/surf the net.

 

when you were a kid, they *had* the net?! ;)

 

i find i don't have enough time in the day, either... but it's a paradox, because when i was a kid there weren't websites with hints and walkthroughs and it took me much, much longer to finish a game. so it seems like i had lots of time to play, and at the same time, games that i could finish now in a week took me months, then.

 

there's something about being grown up that just sucks hours out of the day. i'm sure of it. for example -- got up at 7:00 this morning, got home from work at 7:30 this evening, made dinner, played broken sword for less than an hour... now it's 9:45 and i feel like i should have gone to bed an hour ago... you call this a day?!

 

-emily (grumpy)

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Hm, interesting thread. I'm 3 years younger than SAR, but i'm already starting to feel that "time paradox" thing. I can't really say my problem lies in time planning, as i do that quite well. But it just flies away. I think, that once you pass the learning stage (as a kid and teenager you are absorbing things and every day is something new), you start to fall in daily routine... and after a time you realize the last year was practicaly the same as the year before- true, details are different (you met new people, maybe you fell in love, visited new places, or just do some great stuff at work you are proud of), but all in all, it's more or less familiar stuff- a daily routine. And before you realize, the new year is over and you can't quite remember where did all that time go.

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Dang it, I knew this thread would turn philosophical.

 

Well, Igor, you summed up part of it pretty well. Here's my take: So far for me it comes - and leaves - in stages. Living in the first stage, you don't even have the concept of time yet (too much of it or too little) - you're a kid.

 

In the second stage you're too busy lumping such things as social requisites and material possessions into your life in order to fill up time - it's called uni, fashion, partying, clubbing, first job/apartment/date/whatever. Your concept of time at this point is that of something tradeable (you cancel a date and replace it with an outing to a football match, for example).

 

The next stage is when you really start seeing the value of time, i.e. its 'seeming' rarity and elusiveness, and so time becomes a commodity. And although you have yet to excercise some control over your very own perception of it, you may still continue treating it like you did in your second stage, combining it with some notions of 'bargaining' and 'social worth', or rather, trying to fool yourself into thinking that you're spending time more wisely. At this point you're most likely married and have at least one kid, with you and spouse both working. This is also when you might get into a competition with friends/neighbours/relatives/coworkers over who spends their 'free time' the best: "We just got back from Aix-en-Provence, it was so hot down there"; "I'm putting in six hours a week now at the volunteer center"; "Bob and I are planning on adding a sun room, we're building it ourselves".

 

If you're still single then, like I am, your perception of time will most likely be different, if at least variably so. In my individual situation, I have a lot of time for gaming. For me, however, it's not so much a matter of time, it's a matter of mood. I can't possibly force myself to game, I have to feel like it.

 

Um, sorry to go on and on, but I love pondering on this whole perception of time shifting and changing as you get older and your life moves around. But where does gaming fit into all this? Anywhere you freaking want, baby!! After all, if you really, truly are passionate about games, you make the time for it. Screw everything else in the meanwhile! :D

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I read once about a theory that when you are young, any period of time seems longer since you compare it to your own life -- it's all relative, you know? For instance, for a 15-year-old a year seems like 1/15th of a lifetime, whereas someone in his or her sixties sees the same year going by four times faster. It was not a scientific theory but an interesting thought anyhow.

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I have this theory that stuff like this goes in cycles, but I don't have time to explain it right now. Believe it or not, I did not realize the irony of that statement until I typed it ;). OK, I'll give a vague and unconvincing example: When we're children, we get *very* upset when we don't get what we want. As we grow up, we learn to be more tolerant of the fact that our parents are evil fascists :p. Turn 16, 17ish, and we're suddenly hedonist pigs again. Fall in love, get married, have a baby, we begin to reassess what our priorities are and the whole "need vs. desire" thing. etc. etc. Your mileage may vary (mine sure does), but I feel like the cycle thing still applies.

 

I only have a vague recollection of my theory as it was when I originated it, which is why my example is so unconvincing... When I remember, I'll be able to do a better job, and I'll try to offer a guess as to why this happens.

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Originally posted by Homoludens

it's not so much a matter of time, it's a matter of mood. I can't possibly force myself to game, I have to feel like it.

Same here. There are times when you just don't feel like playing games. Weird but true. :D

 

And sometimes I'm just in the mood for a certain kind of game, for example an action game but not a adventure game, or vice versa.

 

Originally posted by Swordmaster

I read once about a theory that when you are young, any period of time seems longer since you compare it to your own life -- it's all relative, you know?

I've read the same thing. It makes sense I guess.

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All I know is, on my lunch break at work, I go to the conference room and game on my laptop for an hour, while downing some sort of passably edible foodstuffs. One reason: the last thing I really want to do after spending nearly 9 hours in front of a computer at work, is to come home and get back in front of one. Secondly, I really enjoy writing for AG’ers, and in the interest of being a decent contributor, I don’t want to force myself to play a game I have to review and risk the chance of this impacting how I feel about the game, resulting in a biased review.

 

Now, the weekends are a different story, and my availability fluctuates greatly. As to the philosophical conundrums of the different perceptions of time streams – I’ll leave those details to the collegiate-inclined. :)

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I knew someone would nitpick that when I wrote it! Damn you fov!

 

i think i'm just feeling old.

 

i didn't go online until i started college (not counting prodigy and compuserve, which my dad had subscriptions to but we hardly ever used). i still remember the first few times i went online... was probably addicted within the week. :)

 

and that, of course, was *ages* ago...

 

-emily (at the ripe old age of 25)

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My god this thread makes me feel glad to be 14. Actually despite my "young" age I do seem to have a lack of time sometimes (though when it comes to games, it is indeed all about mood), especcially when I try to plan out a scedule. Of course I wake up at 1 o'clock in the afternoon almost every day now, and then just do nothing or have slow breakfast until at least 2..

 

Anyway, I'm off to fix my scedule for good! :p

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I have started this threat

 

And I have read a book about age and time and there is 1 explenation about the time running.

 

When you are young the molecules in your body are splitting very slowly so the time looks very slow but when you get older the molecules are going faster and faster

 

Here an example

 

1 molecule split then you get 2 molecules so when this wil split up then you get 4 and so on

 

1-2-4-8-16-32-64-128-256-1024 ect

 

So when I dubbel my age right now then the time flyes twice as faster.

 

So Kids please try to stay young as long as you can because time is running faster then you think.

 

;-)

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