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Showing content with the highest reputation since 09/17/21 in all areas

  1. Thanks to Jake, I finally got a chance to scan the official Monkey Island poster: Now there's a lot of cleaning up to do. Plus this is merely a starting point for creating a much better expanded and textless artwork.
    6 points
  2. The restoration is coming along nicely: I was a little scared about painting out the logo, but besides using some great sources for the palm trees (unlike 13-or-so years ago, when I didn't have much to work with), I just went and repainted most of the sky. After all, it's just splotches of color, which can be conveniently sampled from inbetween the letters. Adding the appropriate amount of texture on top of it, it works quite well. However, I think I'll still include a logo-less version with a cloud overlay, like in my old versions. The bottom half of the artwork is still missing a bit of material to remove stickers and logos, but I have a few sources that I have yet to train AI models on.
    5 points
  3. I took a grab of the existing version for comparison: New scan: Let me know if I've messed up and this is unrepresentative somehow, Laser. But wow, even with any shortcomings of the scan/photo/repro techniques used, still a huge amount of extra detail!
    5 points
  4. Yes, I'm going to make a bunch of different versions, including that one.
    4 points
  5. Obviously there's only so much you can say about these. Getting there: It's weird to see so much more on the sides when you've gotten used to the cropped art over the years.
    4 points
  6. Unceremoniously pushed back again, to 2022. I prefer to think @Laserschwertfound a subatomic flaw in the box art and halted productuon by heaving his body into the gears.
    4 points
  7. I was previously blind, but now I am able to see that this is popping!
    3 points
  8. It depends on the image, and how many sources I can collect. Apart from actually fixing dirt and damage to a scan, piecing together different sources is the most work in a restoration. And you're right: Color-correcting each one so that they all match can often be tricky. Usually I start out with the best quality source, and try to match everything else to that. Sometimes I need to color-correct different parts of the same scan with different settings, which in turn ups the layer count. Once everything is pieced together in a homogenous way, cleanup and color-correction of the complete image can happen. Regarding keeping my sources clean, in terms of color correction I usually use adjustment layers, so that the source itself isn't changed. But when aligning different scans, the pieces hardly ever fit together without warping or distorting them ever so slightly. That's why a simple swap of sources usually isn't possible. Luckily, aligning can be automated with a bunch of different tools. Most of the time Photoshop's own automatic alignment tool is good enough. In the case of the MI1 poster, which was made up of 15 separate scans, it worked right away. The Rebel Assault 2 poster on the other hand failed miserably (because of so much black space), so I resorted to Hugin, an open-source image stitching tool that can align images by manually placing marker pairs in the different images. It took a few hours of manual work, but the stitched image turned out great.
    3 points
  9. It’s a movie poster size print of the game box art, made from whatever original assets they used at the time so it’s an incredibly detailed reproduction.
    3 points
  10. Here's a link from March: https://www.bossfightstudio.com/2021/03/19/new-sammax/ (btw, it's actually Rubber Pants Commandos - you're getting your Lucasarts-adjacent properties mixed up!)
    2 points
  11. Nope, the poster was only using scans of game releases. Mainly the manuals of the Korean and Taiwanese version of MI2, plus several box scans. If I had access to scans of the original painting, the quality would be much, much higher. Noteworthy: The Korean manual seems to be the only available source of an unobstructed "LeChuck's Revenge" banner.
    2 points
  12. It could be cool to have a raw or unedited version for studying purposes, the details in the brush strokes are really cool to see . Paintings even on paper don't deteriorate too much if they are handled mildly responsibly, that means not trowing them to gather dust and humidity in an open space. The more delicate pieces are the ones made with markers though, if they are not covered from light sources (specially the sun) the colors fade away really fast. Watercolors and acrylic paints can be displayed without problems other than having the paper yellowing (direct sun light without UV filters can yellow the paper, also depends on the paper quality too), gouaches can be displayed too but a drop of water can do a bit of damage if it's not sealed or covered. Oils don't have much of a problem, usually the varnish is the one that gets really yellow and dark and it can be removed and replaced, but I think modern varnishes have less yellowing problems. *On a side note, I was looking for a better version of the Edison's portrait but couldn't find one, I only found a photo posted by Purcell a few years ago, I'm guessing this one was never made public, right? So I took the photo and cleaned it up the best I could and turned out to have really nice colors and details I didn't know it had, it's a shame it looks a bit blurry though, we might need to send a ninja to take photos wherever the original painting is haha!.
    2 points
  13. I guess it depends on what was used for the paintings. Acrylic paint basically turns into plastic once dried, so that should last a while. Oils are obviously more problematic, although it's not like these are renaissance paintings from a few hundred years ago. The painting surface can be the weak spot though... canvas, cardboard or MDF usually aren't water proof unless sealed. But as I understand it, the Lucas archive is a professionally cared for, temperature-controlled facility, so most stuff should be safe. As a matter of fact, Craig Derrick told me he's planning a trip to the archives soon. I asked him to especially look for boxart - originals and slides/transparencies - to at least make sure these are properly stored and modern scans could be made. I doubt that he's in a position to share anything for the poster project, but it would at least ease my mind a bit if these works can be confirmed to be safe. As for the quality of slides: Just look at the quality of the new MI poster. That one was most definitely created from a slide. The detail is very good, but as I mentioned above, there's still room for improvement. But that would require going back to the original painting, because all those shortcomings are now baked into those slides.
    2 points
  14. Thanks to both Jake and Laserschwert for joining forces in this contribution to humanity.
    2 points
  15. The big thing I'm thinking of are of course the original paintings. At least we know that MI2, FOA and Rebel Assault 2 are still in Purcell's and Eaken's possessions. As for stuff like MI1, MM, Zak or The Dig, they must be stored somewhere... I hope. Loom is an interesting one, because it's not a painting but a coloured pencil drawing. So most likely it was done on paper and is thus not as sturdy as paintings made on cardboard, MDF or canvas. Interestingly, GameHistoryOrg's Frank Cifaldi did initially have the MI1 poster photographed at a specialized vendor, but the quality couldn't compete with a flatbed scan, so he ended up scanning it on his A3 scanner. Edit: According to Frank, Steve Purcell confirmed that the poster's colors are accurate. So that settles that.
    2 points
  16. Yep this is the most common. There are digital cameras made at least partially to specialize in this sort of high res studio setup, which slightly vibrate the image censor and take multiple shots to create gigantic mega-res composite photos from a locked down tripod setup. And before digital as far as I know large format film cameras were commonly used, with the resulting shots preserved as slides or transparencies (instead of prints) to preserve as much detail as possible for reproduction. There are surely slides or transparencies of all the box art out there somewhere as it was almost definitely the format used for mailing a copy to magazines for ads, and to international publishers, before print design went fully digital, but who knows where they’d be. Deep in old filing cabinets if they aren’t throw out.
    2 points
  17. I think they realized they made a tragic mistake in eliminating the Ultimate Insult sketch and are willing to pull out all the stops to atone for it.
    2 points
  18. This is a volunteer project, and as such, developers are allowed to work on whatever they feel most fun working with, all of this with its advantages and disadvantages of the thing. Also, LucasArts games are currently being worked on more than you would expect: there has been a SMUSH font rewrite last year which makes it pixel perfect, there have been lots and lots of fixes in the walk code for every single major SCUMM version (from v2 to v8), v7-8 font drawing routine is currently in the process of being overhauled with a version which makes it pixel perfect and which correctly wraps text, COMI sprite decoding routine saw a major bug being fixed, and don't even get me started on iMUSE... I do understand the frustration in seeing that developers apparently neglect or forget old bugs, I really do: I was one of those But: 1) it's simply not true that they are not working on SCUMM games anymore, it's just that every major developer is working on at least two engines at once, so (being an after work activity) they might just not always have time to deal with them; 2) if you are upset about a certain bug, maybe an ancient one which nobody seems to care about anymore, do what I did: learn how to do it, and do it yourself, because if you really are the only one who cares, nobody else is going to do it for you! I'm serious, not being sarcastic, insulting, or anything! It can be a good learning experience and rewarding for sure. Also, about this: I can see how from the outside the attitude might seem a little cold but rest assured, that is how pull requests usually work, after all they are just requests for code review for a new patch. Of course most of the comments are going to be request for fixing syntax, memory leaks, and whatnot, but that is to be expected: the project has to maintain a very high code quality since the application is actually used to ship games on Steam/GOG nowadays.
    2 points
  19. At this point I’d probably say that it’s a volunteer project and so perhaps there simply haven’t been people interested enough in the LucasArts games to work on them. However, I have also seen the… warm and inviting… conversations in some of the code repository threads and pull requests, and it seemed unnecessarily challenging and thankless getting a change accepted. That sort of thing can quickly lead to people not wanting to bother with the hassle, hence a decline in contributions. It may stem from good intentions like not wanting to break all the (Now almost as ancient as the games themselves were!) ScummVM code, but if nobody wants to touch that old stuff it also means those imperfections may stay baked in forever. I agree though Thunderpeel, ScummVM does achieve its goal of making the games functional and portable, albeit with a range of issues from minor (SOMI quirks) to quite major (CMI iMuse, thankfully fixed after 18 years). It has done great stuff allowing people to enjoy them in an accessible manner.
    2 points
  20. The second wave of the figures go up on preorder tomorrow. I personally am not interested in this wave of "Diaper Dynamos" and Scuba Max vs Octopus, but I do look forward a possible third wave of toys... and possible licensed LucasArts properties in the future.
    1 point
  21. Pictured below: what none of us will look like at age 79.
    1 point
  22. I don't have the energy to cover every set leak on the front page, but for people who want to go down that particular rabbit hole: the production is currently in Sicily, and people seem to be photographing the hell out of it. https://www.instagram.com/p/CUusPm6DqgD/
    1 point
  23. The more sources you post, the more impressed I am of the work you’re doing, Laserschwert. You go through such great lengths to get as many sources as you can. After that, it must be hard work puzzling everything together as neatly as you do, and then colour correcting it and making sure the quality of the final image is consistent. In dutch we call such a thing ‘a monk’s job’, because it’s so detailed and strenuous. I’m glad we have you in our community. I’m curious, how many layers do your Photoshop files have, and do you keep the sources in the PSD’s ‘clean’ so you can swap them out when better images become available?
    1 point
  24. Love this, thank you Laserschwert and Jake. What a time to be alive!
    1 point
  25. Yeah, MI1 is important enough to warrant multiple versions.
    1 point
  26. It's the officially released promo poster, available back in the day through the Lucasfilm merch store.
    1 point
  27. Janky might be an overstatement, but they’re nowhere near as tight as the controls of a Mario game for example. (Then again, neither are the controls for Psychonauts 2.)
    1 point
  28. Anyone else excited to see what they do with this? Kotor is one of those games that I think holds up to this day, so it is exciting to see how it will be modernized. Bummed about the timed release thing, but I'm hoping it finds its way to Xbox in my lifetime. Personally, I like the idea of these older games getting remade for a modern audience. (for me, the Monkey Island remakes made me fall in love with it!) https://www.pcgamer.com/kotor-remake/
    1 point
  29. My best guess is they shot themselves in the foot by promising certificates hand-signed by Ron Gilbert, and then accidentally selling multiple thousands of boxsets.
    1 point
  30. 1 point
  31. Nice! (It just redirects to this thread, but I think that's probably the best way to do things, and it's nice to have the url back regardless.)
    1 point
  32. Agree with Benzo. It's just an incredibly satisfying experience, the kind 2021 needs. The post-game game is also surprisingly full of new content -- it's a lot of fun being able to explore the environments with a completely different eye on them.
    1 point
  33. I completed it a few days ago. Its a superb game, really polished and certainly the best game Doublefine has made.
    1 point
  34. I believe Steve sold that painting to a collector and - surprise - it has vanished into hiding without a trace. Collectors are often very bad sharers, unfortunately.
    0 points
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